VERITAS discovery of very high energy gamma-ray emission from S3 1227+25 and multiwavelength observations

AI-generated keywords: Blazar Gamma-ray Multiwavelength Correlations Emission

AI-generated Key Points

  • Very high energy gamma-ray emission detected from blazar S3 1227+25 using VERITAS
  • Observations triggered by a hard-spectrum GeV flare detected on May 15, 2015 with Fermi-LAT
  • Strong 13$\sigma$ detection with a differential photon spectral index, $\Gamma$ = 3.8 $\pm$ 0.4, and a flux level at 9% of the Crab Nebula above 120 GeV
  • Multiwavelength correlations investigated to identify relationships between emission zones and place constraints on dominant mechanisms responsible for blazar emission
  • Multiwavelength lightcurves presented over wider time interval from August 4, 2008 until February 1, 2022 including Fermi-LAT data in two distinct energy ranges, radio lightcurves measured with Mets¨ahovi and OVRO, as well as optical lightcurves obtained from ASAS-SN Sky Patrol and ATLAS data
  • Evidence of strong correlations between Fermi-LAT lightcurves in different energy regimes indicating both MeV and GeV components of the flare have similar origins
  • Evidence of optical and gamma-ray correlations suggesting a single zone model of emission
  • Multiwavelength spectral energy distribution well described by a simple one zone leptonic synchrotron self Compton radiation model
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Authors: Atreya Acharyya (VERITAS Collaboration), Colin Adams (VERITAS Collaboration), Avery Archer (VERITAS Collaboration), Priyadarshini Bangale (VERITAS Collaboration), Wystan Benbow (VERITAS Collaboration), Aryeh Brill (VERITAS Collaboration), Jodi Christiansen (VERITAS Collaboration), Alisha Chromey (VERITAS Collaboration), Manel Errando (VERITAS Collaboration), Abe Falcone (VERITAS Collaboration), Qi Feng (VERITAS Collaboration), John Finley (VERITAS Collaboration), Gregory Foote (VERITAS Collaboration), Lucy Fortson (VERITAS Collaboration), Amy Furniss (VERITAS Collaboration), Greg Gallagher (VERITAS Collaboration), William Hanlon (VERITAS Collaboration), David Hanna (VERITAS Collaboration), Olivier Hervet (VERITAS Collaboration), Claire Hinrichs (VERITAS Collaboration), John Hoang (VERITAS Collaboration), Jamie Holder (VERITAS Collaboration), Weidong Jin (VERITAS Collaboration), Madalyn Johnson (VERITAS Collaboration), Philip Kaaret (VERITAS Collaboration), Mary P. Kertzman (VERITAS Collaboration), David Kieda (VERITAS Collaboration), Tobias Kleiner (VERITAS Collaboration), Nikolas Korzoun (VERITAS Collaboration), Frank Krennrich (VERITAS Collaboration), Mark Lang (VERITAS Collaboration), Matthew Lundy (VERITAS Collaboration), Gernot Maier (VERITAS Collaboration), Conor McGrath (VERITAS Collaboration), Matthew Millard (VERITAS Collaboration), John Millis (VERITAS Collaboration), Connor Mooney (VERITAS Collaboration), Patrick Moriarty (VERITAS Collaboration), Reshmi Mukherjee (VERITAS Collaboration), Stephan O'Brien (VERITAS Collaboration), Rene A. Ong (VERITAS Collaboration), Martin Pohl (VERITAS Collaboration), Elisa Pueschel (VERITAS Collaboration), John Quinn (VERITAS Collaboration), Kenneth J. Ragan (VERITAS Collaboration), Paul Reynolds (VERITAS Collaboration), Deivid Ribeiro (VERITAS Collaboration), Emmet Thomas Roache (VERITAS Collaboration), Iftach Sadeh (VERITAS Collaboration), Alberto Sadun (VERITAS Collaboration), Lab Saha (VERITAS Collaboration), Marcos Santander (VERITAS Collaboration), Glenn Sembroski (VERITAS Collaboration), Ruo Shang (VERITAS Collaboration), Megan Splettstoesser (VERITAS Collaboration), Anjana Talluri (VERITAS Collaboration), James Tucci (VERITAS Collaboration), Vladimir Vassiliev (VERITAS Collaboration), David Williams (VERITAS Collaboration), Sam Wong (VERITAS Collaboration), Talvikki Hovatta, Svetlana Jorstad, Sebastian Kiehlmann, Anne Lahteenmaki, Ioannis Liodakis, Alan Marscher, Walter Max-Moerbeck, Anthony Readhead, Rodrigo Reeves, Paul S Smith, Merja Tornikoski

arXiv: 2305.02860v1 - DOI (astro-ph.HE)
18 pages, 6 figures. Accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal (ApJ)
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: We report the detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the blazar S3 1227+25 (VER J1230+253) with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). VERITAS observations of the source were triggered by the detection of a hard-spectrum GeV flare on May 15, 2015 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT). A combined five-hour VERITAS exposure on May 16th and May 18th resulted in a strong 13$\sigma$ detection with a differential photon spectral index, $\Gamma$ = 3.8 $\pm$ 0.4, and a flux level at 9% of the Crab Nebula above 120 GeV. This also triggered target of opportunity observations with Swift, optical photometry, polarimetry and radio measurements, also presented in this work, in addition to the VERITAS and Fermi-LAT data. A temporal analysis of the gamma-ray flux during this period finds evidence of a shortest variability timescale of $\tau_{obs}$ = 6.2 $\pm$ 0.9 hours, indicating emission from compact regions within the jet, and the combined gamma-ray spectrum shows no strong evidence of a spectral cut-off. An investigation into correlations between the multiwavelength observations found evidence of optical and gamma-ray correlations, suggesting a single-zone model of emission. Finally, the multiwavelength spectral energy distribution is well described by a simple one-zone leptonic synchrotron self-Compton radiation model.

Submitted to arXiv on 04 May. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2305.02860v1

This study reports the detection of very high energy gamma-ray emission from the blazar S3 1227+25 (VER J1230+253) using the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS). The observations were triggered by a hard-spectrum GeV flare detected on May 15, 2015 with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT). A combined five-hour VERITAS exposure on May 16th and May 18th resulted in a strong 13$\sigma$ detection with a differential photon spectral index, $\Gamma$ = 3.8 $\pm$ 0.4, and a flux level at 9% of the Crab Nebula above 120 GeV. This also triggered target of opportunity observations with Swift, optical photometry, polarimetry and radio measurements, in addition to the VERITAS and Fermi-LAT data. The study investigates multiwavelength correlations to identify relationships between emission zones and place constraints on the dominant mechanisms responsible for blazar emission. The authors present multiwavelength lightcurves over a wider time interval from midnight on August 4, 2008 until midnight on February 1, 2022. The lightcurves include Fermi-LAT data in two distinct energy ranges: low energy (0.1–1 GeV) and high energy (1–300 GeV), radio lightcurves measured with Mets¨ahovi and OVRO, as well as optical lightcurves obtained from ASAS-SN Sky Patrol and ATLAS data. Local cross-correlation functions are applied to pairs of two different lightcurves to search for correlations between them. Monte Carlo simulations are used to determine the significance of an obtained LCCF value using artificial light curves that match the probability distribution function (PDF) and power spectral density (PSD) of each observation. The results show evidence of strong correlations between the Fermi-LAT lightcurves in different energy regimes which indicates that both MeV and GeV components of the flare have similar origins. Furthermore, investigation into correlations between multiwavelength observations revealed evidence of optical and gamma-ray correlations suggesting a single zone model of emission. Finally, multiwavelength spectral energy distribution is well described by a simple one zone leptonic synchrotron self Compton radiation model. Overall this study provides valuable insights into blazar emission mechanisms while highlighting importance of investigating multiwavelength correlations to identify relationships between emission zones.
Created on 07 May. 2023

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