Distilling Step-by-Step! Outperforming Larger Language Models with Less Training Data and Smaller Model Sizes

AI-generated keywords: Distillation Finetuning LLMs Multi-task Training Step-by-Step

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Large language models (LLMs) are memory inefficient and compute-intensive for practical applications
  • Smaller task-specific models have been trained using finetuning or distillation, but both methods require large amounts of training data to achieve comparable performance to LLMs
  • A new mechanism called Distilling step-by-step has been introduced that trains smaller models that outperform LLMs while leveraging less training data than finetuning or distillation
  • The method extracts LLM rationales as additional supervision for small models within a multi-task training framework
  • Experiments across four NLP benchmarks showed that the Distilling step-by-step mechanism achieved better performance with much fewer labeled/unlabeled training examples compared to both finetuning and distillation
  • The method achieved better performance using substantially smaller model sizes compared to LLMs
  • The study reduced both the model size and the amount of data required to outperform LLMs; their 770M T5 model outperformed the 540B PaLM model using only 80% of available data on a benchmark task.
  • Authors of this study include Cheng-Yu Hsieh, Chun-Liang Li, Chih-Kuan Yeh, Hootan Nakhost, Yasuhisa Fujii, Alexander Ratner, Ranjay Krishna, Chen-Yu Lee and Tomas Pfister.
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Authors: Cheng-Yu Hsieh, Chun-Liang Li, Chih-Kuan Yeh, Hootan Nakhost, Yasuhisa Fujii, Alexander Ratner, Ranjay Krishna, Chen-Yu Lee, Tomas Pfister

Accepted to Findings of ACL 2023

Abstract: Deploying large language models (LLMs) is challenging because they are memory inefficient and compute-intensive for practical applications. In reaction, researchers train smaller task-specific models by either finetuning with human labels or distilling using LLM-generated labels. However, finetuning and distillation require large amounts of training data to achieve comparable performance to LLMs. We introduce Distilling step-by-step, a new mechanism that (a) trains smaller models that outperform LLMs, and (b) achieves so by leveraging less training data needed by finetuning or distillation. Our method extracts LLM rationales as additional supervision for small models within a multi-task training framework. We present three findings across 4 NLP benchmarks: First, compared to both finetuning and distillation, our mechanism achieves better performance with much fewer labeled/unlabeled training examples. Second, compared to LLMs, we achieve better performance using substantially smaller model sizes. Third, we reduce both the model size and the amount of data required to outperform LLMs; our 770M T5 model outperforms the 540B PaLM model using only 80% of available data on a benchmark task.

Submitted to arXiv on 03 May. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2305.02301v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The deployment of large language models (LLMs) presents challenges due to their memory inefficiency and compute-intensive nature for practical applications. To address this, researchers have trained smaller task-specific models using either finetuning with human labels or distillation using LLM-generated labels. However, both methods require large amounts of training data to achieve comparable performance to LLMs. In response, a new mechanism called Distilling step-by-step has been introduced that trains smaller models that outperform LLMs while leveraging less training data than finetuning or distillation. The method extracts LLM rationales as additional supervision for small models within a multi-task training framework. The study conducted experiments across four NLP benchmarks and presented three key findings. Firstly, compared to both finetuning and distillation, the Distilling step-by-step mechanism achieved better performance with much fewer labeled/unlabeled training examples. Secondly, compared to LLMs, the method achieved better performance using substantially smaller model sizes. Thirdly, the study reduced both the model size and the amount of data required to outperform LLMs; their 770M T5 model outperformed the 540B PaLM model using only 80% of available data on a benchmark task. The authors of this study include Cheng-Yu Hsieh, Chun-Liang Li, Chih-Kuan Yeh, Hootan Nakhost, Yasuhisa Fujii, Alexander Ratner, Ranjay Krishna, Chen-Yu Lee and Tomas Pfister. Their research paper titled "Distilling Step-by-Step! Outperforming Larger Language Models with Less Training Data and Smaller Model Sizes" was accepted for publication in Findings of ACL 2023.
Created on 04 May. 2023

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