Learning Fine-Grained Bimanual Manipulation with Low-Cost Hardware

AI-generated keywords: Robotics Fine Manipulation Action Chunking Transformers Low-Cost

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Fine manipulation tasks in robotics require precision, coordination of contact forces and visual feedback.
  • These tasks typically require high-end robots, accurate sensors or careful calibration which makes them expensive and difficult to set up.
  • Recent developments in learning have enabled low-cost and imprecise hardware to perform these tasks.
  • The paper titled "Learning Fine-Grained Bimanual Manipulation with Low-Cost Hardware" presents a low-cost system that performs end-to-end imitation learning directly from real demonstrations collected using a custom teleoperation interface.
  • The authors develop an algorithm called Action Chunking with Transformers (ACT), which learns a generative model over action sequences to address challenges in high-precision domains.
  • ACT allows the robot to learn six difficult tasks in the real world with 80-90% success rates after only 10 minutes worth of demonstrations.
  • Tasks include opening a translucent condiment cup and slotting a battery.
  • This research shows promise for enabling low-cost robots to perform fine manipulation tasks previously reserved for high-end machines.
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Authors: Tony Z. Zhao, Vikash Kumar, Sergey Levine, Chelsea Finn

Abstract: Fine manipulation tasks, such as threading cable ties or slotting a battery, are notoriously difficult for robots because they require precision, careful coordination of contact forces, and closed-loop visual feedback. Performing these tasks typically requires high-end robots, accurate sensors, or careful calibration, which can be expensive and difficult to set up. Can learning enable low-cost and imprecise hardware to perform these fine manipulation tasks? We present a low-cost system that performs end-to-end imitation learning directly from real demonstrations, collected with a custom teleoperation interface. Imitation learning, however, presents its own challenges, particularly in high-precision domains: errors in the policy can compound over time, and human demonstrations can be non-stationary. To address these challenges, we develop a simple yet novel algorithm, Action Chunking with Transformers (ACT), which learns a generative model over action sequences. ACT allows the robot to learn 6 difficult tasks in the real world, such as opening a translucent condiment cup and slotting a battery with 80-90% success, with only 10 minutes worth of demonstrations. Project website: https://tonyzhaozh.github.io/aloha/

Submitted to arXiv on 23 Apr. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.13705v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The field of robotics has long struggled with fine manipulation tasks, such as threading cable ties or slotting a battery, which require precision, careful coordination of contact forces, and closed-loop visual feedback. Typically, performing these tasks requires high-end robots, accurate sensors, or careful calibration, making them expensive and difficult to set up. However, recent developments in learning have enabled low-cost and imprecise hardware to perform these tasks. In their paper titled "Learning Fine-Grained Bimanual Manipulation with Low-Cost Hardware," Tony Z. Zhao, Vikash Kumar, Sergey Levine, and Chelsea Finn present a low-cost system that performs end-to-end imitation learning directly from real demonstrations collected using a custom teleoperation interface. The authors acknowledge that imitation learning presents its own challenges in high-precision domains: errors in the policy can compound over time and human demonstrations can be non-stationary. To address these challenges, the authors develop a simple yet novel algorithm called Action Chunking with Transformers (ACT), which learns a generative model over action sequences. ACT allows the robot to learn six difficult tasks in the real world with 80-90% success rates after only 10 minutes worth of demonstrations. These tasks include opening a translucent condiment cup and slotting a battery. Overall, this research shows promise for enabling low-cost robots to perform fine manipulation tasks previously reserved for high-end machines. The project website provides further details on the methodology used by the authors and their results demonstrating the potential of this approach to enable low cost robots to carry out complex manipulation tasks.
Created on 05 May. 2023

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