Deep-learning based measurement of planetary radial velocities in the presence of stellar variability

AI-generated keywords: Deep Learning Radial Velocities HARPS-N Neural Networks Stellar Variability

AI-generated Key Points

  • The authors present a deep learning-based approach for measuring small planetary radial velocities in the presence of stellar variability.
  • The primary objective is to develop a DL pipeline that can accurately separate planetary and stellar activity RVs, which is challenging for traditional EPRV approaches.
  • Neural networks are used to reduce stellar RV jitter in three years of HARPS-N sun-as-a-star spectra.
  • Spectra are used instead of CCFs as the dataset, leveraging differences between spectral lines' responses to stellar activity.
  • The unprecedented Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cadence of sun-as-a-star spectra allow them to evaluate the effectiveness and limitations of neural networks at separating stellar and planet-induced RVs in the wavelength domain at sub-m/s precision.
  • The primary dataset used for this work is the HARPS-N Solar Spectra, which includes significant numbers of sunspots, faculae, and plage, as well as convective blueshift variation due to the solar magnetic cycle maximum and minimum that occurred in 2014 and 2019 respectively.
  • To evaluate the ability of DL-based neural networks to separate stellar and planetary RVs, they utilize end-to-end injection and recovery of planet-like Doppler signals.
  • They develop and compare dimensionality reduction and data splitting methods, as well as various neural network architectures including single line CNNs, an ensemble of single line CNNs, and a multi-line CNN.
  • The multi-line CNN is able to recover planets with 0.2 m/s semi amplitude 50 day period with 8.8% error in amplitude and 0.7% error in period.
  • This approach shows promise for mitigating stellar RV variability and enabling detection of small planetary RVs with unprecedented precision.
  • Overall, this work demonstrates the potential of DL based approaches for improving EPRV measurements and pushing the limits of stellar activity correction.
  • The authors provide a detailed description of their data sources, data preparation and preprocessing steps, machine learning approaches, results, future areas for improvement which further highlights its potential applications in astronomy research related fields such as exoplanet detection characterization habitability studies etcetera.
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: Ian Colwell, Virisha Timmaraju, Alexander Wise

arXiv: 2304.04807v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
Draft, unsubmitted, 10 pages, 8 figures
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: We present a deep-learning based approach for measuring small planetary radial velocities in the presence of stellar variability. We use neural networks to reduce stellar RV jitter in three years of HARPS-N sun-as-a-star spectra. We develop and compare dimensionality-reduction and data splitting methods, as well as various neural network architectures including single line CNNs, an ensemble of single line CNNs, and a multi-line CNN. We inject planet-like RVs into the spectra and use the network to recover them. We find that the multi-line CNN is able to recover planets with 0.2 m/s semi-amplitude, 50 day period, with 8.8% error in the amplitude and 0.7% in the period. This approach shows promise for mitigating stellar RV variability and enabling the detection of small planetary RVs with unprecedented precision.

Submitted to arXiv on 10 Apr. 2023

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.04807v1

In this paper, the authors present a deep learning-based approach for measuring small planetary radial velocities in the presence of stellar variability. The primary objective of this work is to develop a DL pipeline that can accurately separate planetary and stellar activity RVs, which is challenging for traditional EPRV approaches. The authors use neural networks to reduce stellar RV jitter in three years of HARPS-N sun-as-a-star spectra. They leverage the differences between spectral lines' responses to stellar activity by using spectra instead of CCFs as their dataset. The unprecedented Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and cadence of sun-as-a-star spectra allow them to evaluate the effectiveness and limitations of neural networks at separating stellar and planet-induced RVs in the wavelength domain at sub-m/s precision. The primary dataset used for this work is the HARPS-N Solar Spectra, which includes significant numbers of sunspots, faculae, and plage, as well as convective blueshift variation due to the solar magnetic cycle maximum and minimum that occurred in 2014 and 2019 respectively. The data are obtained from the University of Geneva Data & Analysis Center for Exoplanets website. To evaluate the ability of DL-based neural networks to separate stellar and planetary RVs, they utilize end-to-end injection and recovery of planet-like Doppler signals. They inject planet-like RVs into the spectra and use the network to recover them. The authors develop and compare dimensionality reduction and data splitting methods, as well as various neural network architectures including single line CNNs, an ensemble of single line CNNs, and a multi-line CNN. They find that the multi-line CNN is able to recover planets with 0.2 m/s semi amplitude 50 day period with 8.8% error in amplitude and 0.7% error in period. This approach shows promise for mitigating stellar RV variability and enabling detection of small planetary RVs with unprecedented precision. Overall, this work demonstrates the potential of DL based approaches for improving EPRV measurements and pushing the limits of stellar activity correction. The authors provide a detailed description of their data sources, data preparation and preprocessing steps machine learning approaches results future areas for improvement which further highlights its potential applications in astronomy research related fields such as exoplanet detection characterization habitability studies etcetera .
Created on 12 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.