Deep reinforcement learning reveals fewer sensors are needed for autonomous gust alleviation

AI-generated keywords: UAVs Autonomous Gust Alleviation Pressure Sensors Fly-by-Feel

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The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The use of UAVs in cities is becoming increasingly necessary due to their potential for various applications
  • Complex urban landscape and unpredictable wind gusts pose a challenge to their safe and effective operation
  • Current methods for mitigating gusts rely on traditional control surfaces and computationally intensive modeling, resulting in slower response times
  • Researchers led by Kevin PT have developed a new approach using deep reinforcement learning to create an autonomous gust alleviation controller for a camber-morphing wing
  • This method reduced the impact of gusts by 84%, using real-time pressure signals from on-board sensors
  • Using only three pressure taps was just as effective as using six, indicating that this reduced-sensor fly-by-feel control could enable UAV missions in previously inaccessible locations.
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Authors: Kevin PT. Haughn, Christina Harvey, Daniel J. Inman

License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract: There is a growing need for uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) to operate in cities. However, the uneven urban landscape and complex street systems cause large-scale wind gusts that challenge the safe and effective operation of UAVs. Current gust alleviation methods rely on traditional control surfaces and computationally expensive modeling to select a control action, leading to a slower response. Here, we used deep reinforcement learning to create an autonomous gust alleviation controller for a camber-morphing wing. This method reduced gust impact by 84%, directly from real-time, on-board pressure signals. Notably, we found that gust alleviation using signals from only three pressure taps was statistically indistinguishable from using six signals. This reduced-sensor fly-by-feel control opens the door to UAV missions in previously inoperable locations.

Submitted to arXiv on 06 Apr. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.03133v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The use of uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAVs) in cities is becoming increasingly necessary due to their potential for various applications. However, the complex urban landscape and unpredictable wind gusts pose a challenge to their safe and effective operation. Current methods for mitigating gusts rely on traditional control surfaces and computationally intensive modeling, resulting in slower response times. Researchers led by Kevin PT have developed a new approach using deep reinforcement learning to create an autonomous gust alleviation controller for a camber-morphing wing. This method reduced the impact of gusts by 84%, using real-time pressure signals from on-board sensors. Remarkably, the study found that using only three pressure taps was just as effective as using six, indicating that this reduced-sensor fly-by-feel control could enable UAV missions in previously inaccessible locations.
Created on 08 Apr. 2023

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