GPT detectors are biased against non-native English writers

AI-generated keywords: GPT detectors AI-generated content Non-native English writers Misclassification bias Ethical implications

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Generative language models have advanced digital communication, but there are concerns about potential misuse of AI-generated content.
  • Detection methods have been proposed to differentiate between AI and human-generated content, but the fairness and robustness of these detectors remain underexplored.
  • A recent study evaluated the performance of widely-used GPT detectors using writing samples from native and non-native English writers.
  • The study found that GPT detectors consistently misclassify non-native English writing samples as AI-generated while accurately identifying native writing samples.
  • Simple prompting strategies can mitigate this misclassification bias and effectively bypass GPT detectors.
  • GPT detectors may unintentionally penalize writers with constrained linguistic expressions.
  • The results call for a broader conversation about the ethical implications of deploying ChatGPT content detectors and caution against their use in evaluative or educational settings where they may inadvertently exclude non-native English speakers from participating in global discourse.
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Authors: Weixin Liang, Mert Yuksekgonul, Yining Mao, Eric Wu, James Zou

Abstract: The rapid adoption of generative language models has brought about substantial advancements in digital communication, while simultaneously raising concerns regarding the potential misuse of AI-generated content. Although numerous detection methods have been proposed to differentiate between AI and human-generated content, the fairness and robustness of these detectors remain underexplored. In this study, we evaluate the performance of several widely-used GPT detectors using writing samples from native and non-native English writers. Our findings reveal that these detectors consistently misclassify non-native English writing samples as AI-generated, whereas native writing samples are accurately identified. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simple prompting strategies can not only mitigate this bias but also effectively bypass GPT detectors, suggesting that GPT detectors may unintentionally penalize writers with constrained linguistic expressions. Our results call for a broader conversation about the ethical implications of deploying ChatGPT content detectors and caution against their use in evaluative or educational settings, particularly when they may inadvertently penalize or exclude non-native English speakers from the global discourse.

Submitted to arXiv on 06 Apr. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.02819v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The rise of generative language models has led to significant advancements in digital communication, but it has also raised concerns about the potential misuse of AI-generated content. While several detection methods have been proposed to differentiate between AI and human-generated content, the fairness and robustness of these detectors remain underexplored. In a recent study, Weixin Liang, Mert Yuksekgonul, Yining Mao, Eric Wu, and James Zou evaluated the performance of widely-used GPT detectors using writing samples from both native and non-native English writers. Their findings revealed that these detectors consistently misclassify non-native English writing samples as AI-generated while accurately identifying native writing samples. The authors further demonstrated that simple prompting strategies can mitigate this misclassification bias and effectively bypass GPT detectors. This suggests that GPT detectors may unintentionally penalize writers with constrained linguistic expressions. The results call for a broader conversation about the ethical implications of deploying ChatGPT content detectors and caution against their use in evaluative or educational settings where they may inadvertently exclude non-native English speakers from participating in global discourse.
Created on 08 Apr. 2023

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