Accretion of aerodynamically large pebbles

AI-generated keywords: Pebble Accretion Stokes Number Planetary Growth Planet Formation Gas Drag

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Pebble accretion has been extensively studied for aerodynamically small pebbles with Stokes number (St) less than 1
  • This study aims to extend the analysis to aerodynamically loosely coupled particles with St greater than 1
  • The authors integrate the equation of motion for pebbles, accounting for gas drag, stellar and planetary gravity in a laminar disc's midplane
  • They calculate the accretion probability ($\epsilon$) as a function of St, disc pressure gradient index, planet mass and eccentricity
  • $\epsilon$(St) first rises for St above unity due to lower drift and aided by a large atmospheric capture radius until it reaches a plateau where efficiency approaches 100%
  • At high St values, the plateau region terminates as particles become trapped in resonance
  • The study provides semi-analytical "kick-and-drift" models and fully analytical prescriptions for $\epsilon$
  • The authors apply their model to $\sim30 \mu$m dust particle accretion in dispersing protoplanetary and secondary (CO-rich) debris discs
  • Physically small particles are mainly accreted as aerodynamically large Stokes number pebbles during the debris disc phase
  • Earth-mass planets may obtain around 25% of their heavy elements through this late accretion phase
  • Overall, this study expands our understanding of pebble accretion beyond aerodynamically small pebbles and highlights its importance in supporting planet formation in different scenarios.
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Authors: Helong Huang, Chris W. Ormel

arXiv: 2304.02044v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
19 pages, 16 figures, 5 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS

Abstract: Due to their aerodynamical coupling with gas, pebbles in protoplanetary discs can drift over large distances to support planet growth in the inner disc. In the past decade, this pebble accretion has been studied extensively for aerodynamically small pebbles (Stokes number St < 1). However, accretion can also operate in the St > 1 mode, e.g., when planetesimals collisionally fragment to smaller bodies or when the primordial gas disc disperses. This work aims to extend the study of pebble accretion to these aerodynamically loosely coupled particles. We integrate the pebble's equation of motion, accounting for gas drag, stellar and planetary gravity, in the midplane of a laminar disc. The accretion probability ($\epsilon$) is calculated as function of Stokes number, disc pressure gradient index, planet mass and eccentricity. We find that for Stokes number above unity $\epsilon$(St) first rises, due to lower drift and aided by a large atmospheric capture radius, until it reaches a plateau where the efficiency approaches 100 per cent. At high St the plateau region terminates as particles become trapped in resonance. These results are well described by a semi-analytical "kick-and-drift" model and we also provide fully analytical prescriptions for $\epsilon$. We apply our model to the accretion of $\sim 30 \mu$m dust particles in a dispersing protoplanetary and secondary (CO-rich) debris disc. It shows that physically small particles are mainly accreted as aerodynamically large Stokes number pebbles during the debris disc phase. Earth-mass planets may obtain $\sim 25$ per cent of their heavy elements through this late accretion phase.

Submitted to arXiv on 04 Apr. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.02044v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The process of pebble accretion has been extensively studied for aerodynamically small pebbles with Stokes number (St) less than 1. However, this study aims to extend the analysis to aerodynamically loosely coupled particles with St greater than 1. The authors integrate the equation of motion for pebbles, accounting for gas drag, stellar and planetary gravity in a laminar disc's midplane. They calculate the accretion probability ($\epsilon$) as a function of St, disc pressure gradient index, planet mass and eccentricity. The results show that $\epsilon$(St) first rises for St above unity due to lower drift and aided by a large atmospheric capture radius until it reaches a plateau where efficiency approaches 100%. At high St values, the plateau region terminates as particles become trapped in resonance. The study provides semi-analytical "kick-and-drift" models and fully analytical prescriptions for $\epsilon$. The authors apply their model to $\sim30 \mu$m dust particle accretion in dispersing protoplanetary and secondary (CO-rich) debris discs. They find that physically small particles are mainly accreted as aerodynamically large Stokes number pebbles during the debris disc phase. Earth-mass planets may obtain around 25% of their heavy elements through this late accretion phase. Overall, this study expands our understanding of pebble accretion beyond aerodynamically small pebbles and highlights its importance in supporting planet formation in different scenarios.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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