LHS 475 b: A Venus-sized Planet Orbiting a Nearby M Dwarf

AI-generated keywords: Exoplanet LHS 475 b TESS MEarth CHIRON

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  • Researchers discovered an exoplanet the size of Venus orbiting LHS 475, an M3 dwarf star located 12.5 parsecs from the Sun
  • The planet was originally reported as TOI 910.01 and has been named LHS 475 b
  • Photometric observations from TESS and ground-based follow-up photometry with MEarth were used to confirm the validity of the transit signal with five individual transits
  • CHIRON radial velocity data ruled out any massive companions in its orbit
  • LHS 475 b has an estimated radius of $0.955 \pm 0.053~\rm{R_{Earth}}$ and an orbital period of $2.0291025 \pm 0.0000020$ days which makes it a terrestrial planet according to observed mass-radius distribution of exoplanets and planet formation theory
  • Its RV semi-amplitude is close to 1 m/s
  • Although too hot to be habitable, this exoplanet is a suitable candidate for emission and transmission spectroscopy studies that could provide more information about its composition and atmosphere
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Authors: Kristo Ment, David Charbonneau, Jonathan Irwin, Jennifer G. Winters, Emily Pass, Avi Shporer, Zahra Essack, Veselin B. Kostov, Michelle Kunimoto, Alan Levine, Sara Seager, Roland Vanderspek, Joshua N. Winn

arXiv: 2304.01920v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
17 pages, 5 figures, submitted to AJ

Abstract: Based on photometric observations by TESS, we present the discovery of a Venus-sized planet transiting LHS 475, an M3 dwarf located 12.5 pc from the Sun. The mass of the star is $0.274 \pm 0.015~\rm{M_{Sun}}$. The planet, originally reported as TOI 910.01, has an orbital period of $2.0291025 \pm 0.0000020$ days and an estimated radius of $0.955 \pm 0.053~\rm{R_{Earth}}$. We confirm the validity and source of the transit signal with MEarth ground-based follow-up photometry of five individual transits. We present radial velocity data from CHIRON that rule out massive companions. In accordance with the observed mass-radius distribution of exoplanets as well as planet formation theory, we expect this Venus-sized companion to be terrestrial, with an estimated RV semi-amplitude close to 1.0 m/s. LHS 475 b is likely too hot to be habitable but is a suitable candidate for emission and transmission spectroscopy.

Submitted to arXiv on 04 Apr. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2304.01920v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

A team of researchers led by Kristo Ment, David Charbonneau and Sara Seager have discovered an exoplanet the size of Venus orbiting LHS 475 - an M3 dwarf star located 12.5 parsecs from the Sun. This planet was originally reported as TOI 910.01 and has been named LHS 475 b. The team used photometric observations from TESS and ground-based follow-up photometry with MEarth to confirm the validity of the transit signal with five individual transits. CHIRON radial velocity data also ruled out any massive companions in its orbit. LHS 475 b has an estimated radius of $0.955 \pm 0.053~\rm{R_{Earth}}$ and an orbital period of $2.0291025 \pm 0.0000020$ days which makes it a terrestrial planet according to observed mass-radius distribution of exoplanets and planet formation theory. Its RV semi-amplitude is close to 1 m/s. Although too hot to be habitable, this exoplanet is a suitable candidate for emission and transmission spectroscopy studies that could provide more information about its composition and atmosphere.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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