Disk or Companion: Characterizing Excess Infrared Flux in Seven White Dwarf Systems with Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

AI-generated keywords: White Dwarf Stars Infrared Excess Dust Disks Brown Dwarf Pairs Markov Chain Monte Carlo

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • White dwarf stars emit excess infrared flux
  • Excess infrared flux can originate from a dusty debris disk or a cool companion
  • Near-infrared spectroscopic observations were conducted on seven white dwarfs with previously identified infrared excesses
  • Dust disks were confirmed around four white dwarfs and two new white dwarf brown dwarf pairs were discovered
  • Near-infrared metal emissions (Mg I, Fe I and Si I) were detected from the gaseous component of the disk in three of the dust disk systems for the first time
  • A new Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework was developed to constrain the geometric properties of each dust disk system
  • In three systems studied by the team, both the dust disk and gas disk appear to coincide spatially
  • Broad molecular absorption features typically seen in L dwarfs were identified in two brown dwarf white dwarf pairs
  • The origin of infrared excess around Gaia J0723+6301 remains unknown
  • Near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to determine sources of infrared excess around white dwarfs
  • Findings provide valuable insights into understanding these mysterious objects' formation and evolution processes.
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: Dylan Owens, Siyi Xu, Elena Manjavacas, S. K. Leggett, S. L. Casewell, Erik Dennihy, Patrick Dufour, Beth L. Klein, Sherry Yeh, B. Zuckerman

arXiv: 2303.16330v1 - DOI (astro-ph.SR)
23 pages, 10 figures, 5 tables, AJ, in press

Abstract: Excess infrared flux from white dwarf stars is likely to arise from a dusty debris disk or a cool companion. In this work, we present near-infrared spectroscopic observations with Keck/MOSFIRE, Gemini/GNIRS, and Gemini/Flamingos-2 of seven white dwarfs with infrared excesses identified in previous studies. We confirmed the presence of dust disks around four white dwarfs (Gaia J0611-6931, Gaia J0006+2858, Gaia J2100+2122, and WD 0145+234) as well as two new white dwarf brown dwarf pairs (Gaia J0052+4505 and Gaia J0603+4518). In three of the dust disk systems, we detected for the first time near-infrared metal emissions (Mg I, Fe I, and Si I) from a gaseous component of the disk. We developed a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework to constrain the geometric properties of each dust disk. In three systems, the dust disk and the gas disk appear to coincide spatially. For the two brown dwarf white dwarf pairs, we identified broad molecular absorption features typically seen in L dwarfs. The origin of the infrared excess around Gaia J0723+6301 remains a mystery. Our study underlines how near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to determine sources of infrared excess around white dwarfs, which has now been detected in hundreds of systems photometrically.

Submitted to arXiv on 28 Mar. 2023

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the AI assistant only knows about the paper metadata rather than the full article.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2303.16330v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

White dwarf stars are known to emit excess infrared flux which is believed to originate from either a dusty debris disk or a cool companion. In this study, the authors present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of seven white dwarfs with previously identified infrared excesses using Keck/MOSFIRE, Gemini/GNIRS and Gemini/Flamingos-2. The team confirmed the presence of dust disks around four white dwarfs (Gaia J0611-6931, Gaia J0006+2858, Gaia J2100+2122 and WD 0145+234) as well as two new white dwarf brown dwarf pairs (Gaia J0052+4505 and Gaia J0603+4518). They also detected near-infrared metal emissions (Mg I, Fe I and Si I) from a gaseous component of the disk in three of the dust disk systems for the first time. To constrain the geometric properties of each dust disk system they developed a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo framework. Interestingly in three systems studied by the team both the dust disk and gas disk appear to coincide spatially. Furthermore broad molecular absorption features typically seen in L dwarfs were identified in two brown dwarf white dwarf pairs. However, the origin of infrared excess around Gaia J0723+6301 remains unknown. This study highlights how near-infrared spectroscopy can be used to determine sources of infrared excess around white dwarfs which has been detected photometrically in hundreds of systems so far. The findings provide valuable insights into understanding these mysterious objects' formation and evolution processes.
Created on 05 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.