The ultraviolet habitable zone of exoplanets

AI-generated keywords: Extraterrestrial life Habitable Zone Ultraviolet radiation Abiogenesis M-dwarf stars

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Dozens of rocky exoplanets have been discovered in the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ)
  • Liquid water is present on these planets but it does not guarantee their habitability
  • Building blocks of life are produced photochemically in presence of a minimum ultraviolet (UV) flux
  • High UV flux can be detrimental to life by leading to atmospheric erosion and damaging biomolecules essential to its survival
  • Researchers from Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics and University of Milan-Bicocca have defined UV boundary conditions within which life can possibly emerge and evolve, called Ultraviolet Habitable Zone (UHZ)
  • Only stars with effective temperature greater than 3900 K illuminate their CHZ planets with enough NUV radiation to trigger abiogenesis through cyanosulfidic chemistry
  • Eighteen out of twenty-three CHZ exoplanets actually orbit outside the UHZ because their M-dwarf hosts do not emit enough NUV radiation to trigger abiogenesis on them.
  • It is important to consider the UV radiation emitted by host stars when assessing the habitability of exoplanets.
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: Riccardo Spinelli, Francesco Borsa, Giancarlo Ghirlanda, Gabriele Ghisellini, Francesco Haardt

arXiv: 2303.16229v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
8 pages, 3 figures

Abstract: The dozens of rocky exoplanets discovered in the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ) currently represent the most suitable places to host life as we know it outside the Solar System. However, the presumed presence of liquid water on the CHZ planets does not guarantee suitable environments for the emergence of life. According to experimental studies, the building blocks of life are most likely produced photochemically in presence of a minimum ultraviolet (UV) flux. On the other hand, high UV flux can be life-threatening, leading to atmospheric erosion and damaging biomolecules essential to life. These arguments raise questions about the actual habitability of CHZ planets around stars other than Solar-type ones, with different UV to bolometric luminosity ratios. By combining the "principle of mediocricy" and recent experimental studies, we define UV boundary conditions (UV-habitable Zone, UHZ) within which life can possibly emerge and evolve. We investigate whether exoplanets discovered in CHZs do indeed experience such conditions. By analysing Swift-UV/Optical Telescope data, we measure the near ultraviolet (NUV) luminosities of 17 stars harbouring 23 planets in their CHZ. We derive an empirical relation between NUV luminosity and stellar effective temperature. We find that eighteen of the CHZ exoplanets actually orbit outside the UHZ, i.e., the NUV luminosity of their M-dwarf hosts is decisively too low to trigger abiogenesis - through cyanosulfidic chemistry - on them. Only stars with effective temperature >3900 K illuminate their CHZ planets with enough NUV radiation to trigger abiogenesis. Alternatively, colder stars would require a high-energy flaring activity.

Submitted to arXiv on 28 Mar. 2023

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the AI assistant only knows about the paper metadata rather than the full article.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2303.16229v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In recent years, the discovery of dozens of rocky exoplanets in the Circumstellar Habitable Zone (CHZ) has sparked increased interest in the search for extraterrestrial life. While these planets may have liquid water - a key ingredient for life as we know it - this alone does not guarantee their habitability. Experimental studies suggest that the building blocks of life are most likely produced photochemically in presence of a minimum ultraviolet (UV) flux. However, high UV flux can be detrimental to life by leading to atmospheric erosion and damaging biomolecules essential to its survival. To better understand the actual habitability of CHZ planets around stars other than Solar-type ones with different UV to bolometric luminosity ratios, researchers from Italy's National Institute for Astrophysics and University of Milan-Bicocca have defined UV boundary conditions within which life can possibly emerge and evolve. By combining the "principle of mediocrity" and recent experimental studies, they have established an Ultraviolet Habitable Zone (UHZ), which represents the range of UV radiation that is conducive to abiogenesis – the emergence of life from non-living matter. The team analyzed data from Swift-UV/Optical Telescope on 17 stars hosting 23 planets in their CHZs and measured their near ultraviolet (NUV) luminosities. They derived an empirical relation between NUV luminosity and stellar effective temperature and found that only stars with effective temperature greater than 3900 K illuminate their CHZ planets with enough NUV radiation to trigger abiogenesis through cyanosulfidic chemistry. Alternatively, colder stars would require a high-energy flaring activity. Their findings suggest that eighteen out of twenty-three CHZ exoplanets actually orbit outside the UHZ because their M-dwarf hosts do not emit enough NUV radiation to trigger abiogenesis on them. This study highlights how important it is to consider the UV radiation emitted by host stars when assessing the habitability of exoplanets and provides a framework for future studies in pursuit of extraterrestrial life.
Created on 06 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.