The barriers to sustainable risk transfer in the cyber-insurance market

AI-generated keywords: Cyber-Insurance Economic Efficiency Reinsurance Data Sharing Risk Tolerance

AI-generated Key Points

  • The paper focuses on achieving economic efficiency in cyber-insurance markets
  • Quoted cyber-insurance premiums are unlikely to be efficient due to the constantly evolving nature of cyber-threats and lack of public data sharing
  • Monte Carlo simulations were used to compare efficient and inefficient outcomes based on the informational setup between market participants
  • The literature review highlights the essentials of reinsurance and technical actuarial papers relevant to cyber-insurance, including Borch's work on describing conditions required for equilibrium in a reinsurance market and Kaluszka's introduction of optimal reinsurance treaty pricing derived from classical literature
  • Schlesinger and Doherty's treatment of issues associated with incomplete insurance markets suggests that focusing on correlation of risks is essential for making use of incomplete markets theory
  • Optimal involvement of reinsurance was computed under different assumptions regarding the distribution of risks, with limited involvement leading to increased premia and lower overall capacity when loss expectations are not shared
  • Better data sharing and external sources of risk tolerant capital are necessary for sustainability in cyber-insurance markets due to the dynamic nature of cyber-threats and absence of reliable centralized incident reporting.
  • Further work could include considering correlations between losses using more complex loss-generating functions than those used in this study, as well as comparing results under high loss scenarios proposed by various distributions reviewed in Section II.2.
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Authors: Henry Skeoch, Christos Ioannidis

29 pages, 9 figures, 11 tables
License: CC BY-NC-SA 4.0

Abstract: Smooth risk transfer is a key condition for the development of an insurance market that is well-functioning and sustainable. The constantly evolving nature of cyber-threats and lack of public data sharing means the economic conditions required for quoted cyber-insurance premiums to be considered efficient are highly unlikely to be met. This paper develops Monte Carlo simulations of an artificial cyber-insurance market and compares the efficient and inefficient outcomes based on the informational setup between the market participants. The existence of diverse loss distributions is justified by the dynamic nature of cyber-threats and the absence of any reliable and centralised incident reporting. We show that the limited involvement of reinsurers when loss expectations are not shared leads to increased premia and lower overall capacity. This suggests that the sustainability of the cyber-insurance market requires both better data sharing and external sources of risk tolerant capital.

Submitted to arXiv on 03 Mar. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2303.02061v1

This paper focuses on the conditions required for achieving economic efficiency in cyber-insurance markets. The constantly evolving nature of cyber-threats and lack of public data sharing make it highly unlikely that quoted cyber-insurance premiums will be considered efficient. To address this issue, Monte Carlo simulations of an artificial cyber-insurance market were developed, and efficient and inefficient outcomes were compared based on the informational setup between market participants. The literature review highlights the essentials of reinsurance and technical actuarial papers relevant to cyber-insurance. Borch's work on describing the conditions required to achieve equilibrium in a reinsurance market is particularly relevant, as is Kaluszka's introduction of optimal reinsurance treaty pricing derived from classical literature. Schlesinger and Doherty's treatment of issues associated with incomplete insurance markets suggests that focusing on correlation of risks is essential for making use of incomplete markets theory. The paper examines the impact of diverse anticipations regarding cyber-losses for firms, insurers, and reinsurers in an artificial market. Optimal involvement of reinsurance was computed under different assumptions regarding the distribution of risks. The limited involvement of reinsurers when loss expectations are not shared leads to increased premia and lower overall capacity, suggesting that better data sharing and external sources of risk tolerant capital are necessary for sustainability. Further work could include considering correlations between losses using more complex loss-generating functions than those used in this study. It would also be instructive to compare results under high loss scenarios proposed by various distributions reviewed in Section II.2. In conclusion, smooth risk transfer is crucial for developing a well-functioning and sustainable insurance market. However, achieving economic efficiency in cyber-insurance markets requires better data sharing and external sources of risk tolerant capital due to the dynamic nature of cyber-threats and absence of reliable centralized incident reporting.
Created on 12 Apr. 2023

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