Is a spectrograph of hidden variables possible?

AI-generated keywords: Quantum Mechanics Realism Spectrograph Bell's Inequalities Locality

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • A new definition of "Realism" has been proposed in the field of quantum mechanics by Alejandro A. Hnilo.
  • The definition proposes that a hypothetical "spectrograph" of hidden variables should behave like an actual spectrograph that measures wavelengths.
  • The question is whether this definition alone can lead to the derivation of Bell's inequalities, which describe the limits on correlations between distant particles in quantum mechanics.
  • Hnilo reports that such a spectrograph is compatible with the violation of Bell's inequalities, challenging existing beliefs about the relationship between realism and locality in quantum mechanics.
  • Hnilo shows that "Spectrograph's Realism" and "Locality" are two distinct and necessary hypotheses for deriving Bell's inequalities.
  • This finding sheds new light on the controversy surrounding the assumptions required for deriving Bell's inequalities and provides insights into how hidden variables could potentially explain quantum phenomena.
  • The paper concludes by emphasizing the importance of considering both realism and locality when attempting to derive Bell’s inequalities from first principles.
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Authors: Alejandro A. Hnilo

arXiv: 2303.0003v1 - DOI (quant-ph)
7 pages, 2 figures

Abstract: A new definition of "Realism" is proposed: it is that a gedanken "spectrograph" of hidden variables behaves as an actual (say, wavelength) spectrograph. The question is: does this definition allow, by itself, the derivation of Bell's inequalities? If it were, then such a spectrograph would be impossible, for Bell's inequalities are observed to be violated. In this short paper it is reported that, on the contrary, such spectrograph is compatible with the violation of Bell's inequalities. This result puts some new light on the controversy about the hypotheses necessary to derive Bell's inequalities. In particular, "Spectrograph's Realism", and "Locality", are proven to be different, and both necessary, hypotheses to derive Bell's inequalities.

Submitted to arXiv on 28 Feb. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2303.0003v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In the field of quantum mechanics, a new definition of "Realism" has been proposed by Alejandro A. Hnilo in his paper titled "Is a spectrograph of hidden variables possible?". According to this definition, a hypothetical "spectrograph" of hidden variables should behave like an actual spectrograph that measures wavelengths. The question is whether this definition alone can lead to the derivation of Bell's inequalities, which describe the limits on correlations between distant particles in quantum mechanics. If it were true, then such a spectrograph would be impossible because Bell's inequalities have been observed to be violated. However, Hnilo reports that such a spectrograph is compatible with the violation of Bell's inequalities. This finding sheds new light on the controversy surrounding the assumptions required for deriving Bell's inequalities and provides insights into how hidden variables could potentially explain quantum phenomena. Hnilo further shows that "Spectrograph's Realism" and "Locality" are two distinct and necessary hypotheses for deriving Bell's inequalities. His paper challenges existing beliefs about the relationship between realism and locality in quantum mechanics and suggests avenues for further research into understanding these complex concepts in quantum mechanics. The paper concludes by emphasizing the importance of considering both realism and locality when attempting to derive Bell’s inequalities from first principles.
Created on 20 Mar. 2023

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