The CARMENES search for exoplanets around M dwarfs. Guaranteed time observations Data Release 1 (2016-2020)

AI-generated keywords: CARMENES Radial Velocity Exoplanet Stellar Activity Planet Occurrence

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  • The CARMENES instrument was designed to search for temperate rocky planets around nearby cool stars by delivering high-accuracy radial velocity (RV) measurements with long-term stability.
  • CARMENES Data Release 1 (DR1) includes all observations obtained during the guaranteed time observations from 2016 to 2020, consisting of 19,633 spectra for a sample of 362 targets.
  • The survey target selection aimed at minimising biases, resulting in about 70% of all known M dwarfs within 10 pc and accessible from Calar Alto being included.
  • High-level data products were derived, including 18,642 precise RVs for 345 targets and time series data of spectroscopic activity indicators.
  • Examples are given on how CARMENES data have been used to identify and measure planetary companions as well as determine stellar properties, characterise stellar activity, and study exoplanet atmospheres.
  • The contextual view provided by the survey reveals an exoplanet population that includes 33 new planets, 17 re-analysed planets, and 26 confirmed planets from transiting candidate follow-up.
  • A subsample of 238 targets was used to derive updated planet occurrence rates yielding an overall average of nearly every M dwarf hosting at least one planet with a mass between 1 M_Earth < M sin i <1000 M_Earth and orbital period between 1 d < P_orb <1000 d.
  • CARMENES is a valuable tool for future exoplanet studies due to its long-term stability in RV measurements and broad wavelength coverage providing valuable spectral information to assess potential RV signals.
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Authors: Th. Henning, A. Pavlov, E. Pallé, K. Molaverdikhani, A. Quirrenbach, V. J. S. Béjar, I. Ribas, A. Reiners, M. Zechmeister, J. A. Caballero, J. C. Morales, S. Sabotta, D. Baroch, P. J. Amado, M. Abril, J. Aceituno, G. Anglada-Escudé, M. Azzaro, D. Barrado, D. Benítez de Haro, G. Bergond, P. Bluhm, R. Calvo Ortega, C. Cardona Guillén, P. Chaturvedi, C. Cifuentes, J. Colomé, D. Cont, M. Cortés-Contreras, S. Czesla, E. Díez-Alonso, S. Dreizler, C. Duque-Arribas, N. Espinoza, M. Fernández, B. Fuhrmeister, D. Galadí-Enríquez, A. García-López, E. González-Álvarez, J. I. González Hernández, E. W. Guenther, E. de Guindos, A. P. Hatzes, E. Herrero, D. Hintz, Á. L. Huelmo, S. V. Jeffers, E. N. Johnson, E. de Juan, A. Kaminski, J. Kemmer, J. Khaimova, S. Khalafinejad, D. Kossakowski, M. Kürster, F. Labarga, M. Lafarga, S. Lalitha, M. Lampón, J. Lillo-Box, N. Lodieu, M. J. López González, M. López-Puertas, R. Luque, H. Magán, L. Mancini, E. Marfil, E. L. Martín, S. Martín-Ruiz, D. Montes, E. Nagel, L. Nortmann, G. Nowak, V. M. Passegger, S. Pedraz, V. Perdelwitz, M. Perger, A. Ramón-Ballesta, S. Reffert, D. Revilla, E. Rodríguez, C. Rodríguez-López, S. Sadegi, M. Á. Sánchez Carrasco, A. Sánchez-López, J. Sanz-Forcada, S. Schäfer, M. Schlecker, J. H. M. M. Schmitt, P. Schöfer, A. Schweitzer, W. Seifert, Y. Shan, S. L. Skrzypinski, E. Solano, O. Stahl, M. Stangret, S. Stock, J. Stürmer, H. M. Tabernero, L. Tal-Or, T. Trifonov, S. Vanaverbeke, F. Yan, M. R. Zapatero Osorio

arXiv: 2302.10528v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
Published in A&A (https://www.aanda.org/10.1051/0004-6361/202244879), 25 pages, 12 figures, Tables 1 and 2 only available online

Abstract: The CARMENES instrument was conceived to deliver high-accuracy radial velocity (RV) measurements with long-term stability to search for temperate rocky planets around a sample of nearby cool stars. The broad wavelength coverage was designed to provide a range of stellar activity indicators to assess the nature of potential RV signals and to provide valuable spectral information to help characterise the stellar targets. The CARMENES Data Release 1 (DR1) makes public all observations obtained during the CARMENES guaranteed time observations, which ran from 2016 to 2020 and collected 19,633 spectra for a sample of 362 targets. The CARMENES survey target selection was aimed at minimising biases, and about 70% of all known M dwarfs within 10 pc and accessible from Calar Alto were included. The data were pipeline-processed, and high-level data products, including 18,642 precise RVs for 345 targets, were derived. Time series data of spectroscopic activity indicators were also obtained. We discuss the characteristics of the CARMENES data, the statistical properties of the stellar sample, and the spectroscopic measurements. We show examples of the use of CARMENES data and provide a contextual view of the exoplanet population revealed by the survey, including 33 new planets, 17 re-analysed planets, and 26 confirmed planets from transiting candidate follow-up. A subsample of 238 targets was used to derive updated planet occurrence rates, yielding an overall average of 1.44+/-0.20 planets with 1 M_Earth < M sin i < 1000 M_Earth and 1 d < P_orb < 1000 d per star, and indicating that nearly every M dwarf hosts at least one planet. CARMENES data have proven very useful for identifying and measuring planetary companions as well as for additional applications, such as the determination of stellar properties, the characterisation of stellar activity, and the study of exoplanet atmospheres.

Submitted to arXiv on 21 Feb. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2302.10528v1

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The CARMENES instrument was designed to search for temperate rocky planets around nearby cool stars by delivering high-accuracy radial velocity (RV) measurements with long-term stability. Its broad wavelength coverage also provides valuable spectral information to help characterise the stellar targets and assess the nature of potential RV signals. The recently released CARMENES Data Release 1 (DR1) includes all observations obtained during the guaranteed time observations from 2016 to 2020, consisting of 19,633 spectra for a sample of 362 targets. The survey target selection aimed at minimising biases, resulting in about 70% of all known M dwarfs within 10 pc and accessible from Calar Alto being included. The data were pipeline-processed, and high-level data products were derived, including 18,642 precise RVs for 345 targets and time series data of spectroscopic activity indicators. The statistical properties of the stellar sample and spectroscopic measurements are discussed in detail. Examples are given on how CARMENES data have been used to identify and measure planetary companions as well as determine stellar properties, characterise stellar activity, and study exoplanet atmospheres. The contextual view provided by the survey reveals an exoplanet population that includes 33 new planets, 17 re-analysed planets, and 26 confirmed planets from transiting candidate follow-up. A subsample of 238 targets was used to derive updated planet occurrence rates yielding an overall average of nearly every M dwarf hosting at least one planet with a mass between 1 M_Earth < M sin i <1000 M_Earth and orbital period between 1 d < P_orb <1000 d. Overall, the CARMENES DR1 has proven very useful for identifying planetary companions as well as additional applications such as determining stellar properties and studying exoplanet atmospheres. With its long-term stability in RV measurements and broad wavelength coverage providing valuable spectral information to assess potential RV signals, CARMENES is a valuable tool for future exoplanet studies.
Created on 06 Apr. 2023

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