Characterizing the VPN Ecosystem in the Wild

AI-generated keywords: VPN Security Protocols Traffic Vulnerabilities

AI-generated Key Points

  • COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increase in VPN usage globally
  • Measuring traffic and security aspects of VPN ecosystem is now more important than ever
  • Detecting and characterizing VPN traffic remains challenging due to some protocols using the same port number as web traffic
  • Paper aims at detecting and characterizing VPN servers in the wild to facilitate identifying VPN traffic
  • 9.8 million VPN servers distributed globally using OpenVPN, SSTP, PPTP, and IPsec protocols were identified through Internet-wide active measurements
  • SSTP protocol is the most vulnerable among those detected with over 90% of servers being vulnerable to TLS downgrade attacks
  • 2% of all servers that respond to their VPN probes also respond to HTTP probes and are classified as Web servers.
  • The list of VPN servers was used to identify VPN traffic in a large European ISP's network, where 2.6% of all traffic was related to these VPN servers.
  • Research provides valuable insights into the state of security for VPN solutions used by individuals and organizations worldwide.
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Authors: Aniss Maghsoudlou, Lukas Vermeulen, Ingmar Poese, Oliver Gasser

Proceedings of the Passive and Active Measurement Conference 2023 (PAM '23)
Code and data availabe at https://vpnecosystem.github.io/
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: With the shift to working remotely after the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) around the world has nearly doubled. Therefore, measuring the traffic and security aspects of the VPN ecosystem is more important now than ever. It is, however, challenging to detect and characterize VPN traffic since some VPN protocols use the same port number as web traffic and port-based traffic classification will not help. VPN users are also concerned about the vulnerabilities of their VPN connections due to privacy issues. In this paper, we aim at detecting and characterizing VPN servers in the wild, which facilitates detecting the VPN traffic. To this end, we perform Internet-wide active measurements to find VPN servers in the wild, and characterize them based on their vulnerabilities, certificates, locations, and fingerprinting. We find 9.8M VPN servers distributed around the world using OpenVPN, SSTP, PPTP, and IPsec, and analyze their vulnerability. We find SSTP to be the most vulnerable protocol with more than 90% of detected servers being vulnerable to TLS downgrade attacks. Of all the servers that respond to our VPN probes, 2% also respond to HTTP probes and therefore are classified as Web servers. We apply our list of VPN servers to the traffic from a large European ISP and observe that 2.6% of all traffic is related to these VPN servers.

Submitted to arXiv on 13 Feb. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2302.06566v1

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a significant increase in the use of Virtual Private Networks (VPNs) around the world, as remote work and online activities have become more prevalent. As a result, it is now more important than ever to measure the traffic and security aspects of the VPN ecosystem. However, detecting and characterizing VPN traffic remains challenging due to some VPN protocols using the same port number as web traffic. This makes port-based traffic classification ineffective, and VPN users are also concerned about their connections' vulnerabilities due to privacy issues. To address these challenges, this paper aims at detecting and characterizing VPN servers in the wild, which facilitates identifying VPN traffic. The authors perform Internet-wide active measurements to find VPN servers worldwide and analyze their cryptographic certificates, vulnerabilities, locations, and fingerprints. They identify 9.8 million VPN servers distributed globally using OpenVPN, SSTP, PPTP, and IPsec protocols. The study finds that SSTP is the most vulnerable protocol among those detected with over 90% of servers being vulnerable to TLS downgrade attacks. Additionally, out of all the servers that respond to their VPN probes, 2% also respond to HTTP probes and are classified as Web servers. The authors apply their list of VPN servers to identify VPN traffic in a large European ISP's network and observe that 2.6% of all traffic is related to these VPN servers. This research provides valuable insights into the state of security for VPN solutions used by individuals and organizations worldwide. The findings can help improve security measures for both users and providers while highlighting areas where further research is needed to enhance privacy protection for online activities.
Created on 26 Mar. 2023

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