Presence of liquid water during the evolution of exomoons orbiting ejected free-floating planets

AI-generated keywords: Exomoons Habitability Atmosphere Liquid Water Tidal Friction

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  • This study explores the possibility of exomoons orbiting free-floating planets (FFPs) retaining liquid water on their surfaces after ejection from a planetary system.
  • The authors perform dynamical simulations to infer the statistics of surviving exomoons around FFPs and investigate the subsequent tidal evolution of their orbital parameters.
  • Close-in Earth-mass moons with CO$_2$-dominated atmospheres could retain liquid water for long timescales, depending on the mass of the atmospheric envelope and surface pressure assumed.
  • Massive atmospheres are needed to trap heat produced by tidal friction which makes these moons habitable.
  • For Earth-like pressure conditions ($p_0$ = 1 bar), satellites could sustain liquid water up to 52 million years (Myr), while higher surface pressures (10 and 100 bar) could extend habitability up to 276 Myr and 1.6 billion years (Gyr), respectively.
  • Close-in satellites experience habitable conditions for extended periods of time, remaining bound with the escaping planet during FFP ejection and being less affected by close encounters.
  • The presence of an atmosphere with high optical thickness may support the formation and maintenance of oceans of liquid water on these isolated planetary-mass objects' surfaces, making them potential candidates for future astrobiological investigations.
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Authors: Giulia Roccetti, Tommaso Grassi, Barbara Ercolano, Karan Molaverdikhani, Aurélien Crida, Dieter Braun, Andrea Chiavassa

arXiv: 2302.04946v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
21 pages, 12 figures, accepted for publication on International Journal of Astrobiology

Abstract: Free-floating planets (FFPs) can result from dynamical scattering processes happening in the first few million years of a planetary system's life. Several models predict the possibility, for these isolated planetary-mass objects, to retain exomoons after their ejection. The tidal heating mechanism and the presence of an atmosphere with a relatively high optical thickness may support the formation and maintenance of oceans of liquid water on the surface of these satellites. In order to study the timescales over which liquid water can be maintained, we perform dynamical simulations of the ejection process and infer the resulting statistics of the population of surviving exomoons around free-floating planets. The subsequent tidal evolution of the moons' orbital parameters is a pivotal step to determine when the orbits will circularize, with a consequential decay of the tidal heating. We find that close-in ($a \lesssim 25 $R$_{\rm J}$) Earth-mass moons with CO$_2$-dominated atmospheres could retain liquid water on their surfaces for long timescales, depending on the mass of the atmospheric envelope and the surface pressure assumed. Massive atmospheres are needed to trap the heat produced by tidal friction that makes these moons habitable. For Earth-like pressure conditions ($p_0$ = 1 bar), satellites could sustain liquid water on their surfaces up to 52 Myr. For higher surface pressures (10 and 100 bar), moons could be habitable up to 276 Myr and 1.6 Gyr, respectively. Close-in satellites experience habitable conditions for long timescales, and during the ejection of the FFP remain bound with the escaping planet, being less affected by the close encounter.

Submitted to arXiv on 09 Feb. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2302.04946v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

This study explores the possibility of exomoons orbiting free-floating planets (FFPs) retaining liquid water on their surfaces after ejection from a planetary system. The authors perform dynamical simulations to infer the statistics of surviving exomoons around FFPs and investigate the subsequent tidal evolution of their orbital parameters. They find that close-in Earth-mass moons with CO$_2$-dominated atmospheres could retain liquid water for long timescales, depending on the mass of the atmospheric envelope and surface pressure assumed. Massive atmospheres are needed to trap heat produced by tidal friction which makes these moons habitable. For Earth-like pressure conditions ($p_0$ = 1 bar), satellites could sustain liquid water up to 52 million years (Myr), while higher surface pressures (10 and 100 bar) could extend habitability up to 276 Myr and 1.6 billion years (Gyr), respectively. Close-in satellites experience habitable conditions for extended periods of time, remaining bound with the escaping planet during FFP ejection and being less affected by close encounters. The presence of an atmosphere with high optical thickness may support the formation and maintenance of oceans of liquid water on these isolated planetary-mass objects' surfaces, making them potential candidates for future astrobiological investigations.
Created on 28 Mar. 2023

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