Takeout and Delivery: Erasing the Dusty Signature of Late-stage Terrestrial Planet Formation

AI-generated keywords: Terrestrial Planet Formation Giant Impacts Dusty Debris Stellar Wind Aerodynamic Drag

AI-generated Key Points

  • Terrestrial planet formation culminates in late-stage giant impacts that generate warm, dusty debris
  • Dusty debris signature of terrestrial planet formation is rarely detected, suggesting transport mechanisms capable of erasing the debris signature
  • Mechanisms such as regeneration of a tenuous gas disk via "takeout" or "delivery," and powerful stellar wind from a young star can remove warm debris and make terrestrial planets assemble inconspicuously
  • Observable signposts of terrestrial planet formation are more challenging to detect than previously assumed
  • Collisions between large objects during planet formation may not always result in dust production due to high velocity shattering, producing only small fragments that are quickly removed by radiation pressure from the central star or collisional grinding
  • Any dust produced by giant impacts is expected to remain bright and observable for an extended period in the absence of removal mechanisms other than collisions and stellar radiation pressure
  • Gas from liberated planetary atmospheres could also affect detection rates
  • Observational tests are required to confirm these ideas.
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Authors: Joan R. Najita, Scott J. Kenyon

arXiv: 2301.05719v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
20 pages, 3 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: The formation of planets like Earth is expected to conclude with a series of late-stage giant impacts that generate warm dusty debris, the most anticipated visible signpost of terrestrial planet formation in progress. While there is now evidence that Earth-sized terrestrial planets orbit a significant fraction of solar-type stars, the anticipated dusty debris signature of their formation is rarely detected. Here we discuss several ways in which our current ideas about terrestrial planet formation imply transport mechanisms capable of erasing the anticipated debris signature. A tenuous gas disk may be regenerated via "takeout" (i.e., the liberation of planetary atmospheres in giant impacts) or "delivery" (i.e., by asteroids and comets flung into the terrestrial planet region) at a level sufficient to remove the warm debris. The powerful stellar wind from a young star can also act, its delivered wind momentum producing a drag that removes warm debris. If such processes are efficient, terrestrial planets may assemble inconspicuously, with little publicity and hoopla accompanying their birth. Alternatively, the rarity of warm excesses may imply that terrestrial planets typically form very early, emerging fully formed from the nebular phase without undergoing late-stage giant impacts. In either case, the observable signposts of terrestrial planet formation appear more challenging to detect than previously assumed. We discuss observational tests of these ideas.

Submitted to arXiv on 13 Jan. 2023

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2301.05719v1

The formation of terrestrial planets like Earth is expected to culminate in a series of late-stage giant impacts that generate warm, dusty debris. However, despite evidence that Earth-sized terrestrial planets orbit a significant fraction of solar-type stars, the anticipated dusty debris signature of their formation is rarely detected. This suggests that our current understanding of terrestrial planet formation implies transport mechanisms capable of erasing the anticipated debris signature. One such mechanism is the regeneration of a tenuous gas disk via "takeout" or "delivery," which can remove warm debris by liberating planetary atmospheres in giant impacts or flinging asteroids and comets into the terrestrial planet region. Another mechanism is the powerful stellar wind from a young star, which can produce drag and remove warm debris. If these processes are efficient, terrestrial planets may assemble inconspicuously without much publicity or hoopla accompanying their birth. Alternatively, it's possible that terrestrial planets typically form very early and emerge fully formed from the nebular phase without undergoing late-stage giant impacts. In either case, observable signposts of terrestrial planet formation appear more challenging to detect than previously assumed. Recent studies suggest that collisions between large objects during planet formation may not always result in dust production due to high velocity shattering. Instead, they may produce only small fragments that are quickly removed by radiation pressure from the central star or collisional grinding. This means that any dust produced by giant impacts is expected to remain bright and observable for an extended period in the absence of removal mechanisms other than collisions and stellar radiation pressure. Another factor affecting detection rates could be gas from liberated planetary atmospheres. Terrestrial planets that acquire a significant mass while the nebular gas disk is present are expected to capture tenuous primordial atmospheres whose mass depends on nebular density. These atmospheres can be similar to those needed for aerodynamic drag to remove dusty debris. Overall, detecting observable signposts of terrestrial planet formation appears more challenging than previously assumed, and observational tests are required to confirm these ideas.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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