Limb darkening measurements from TESS and Kepler light curves of transiting exoplanets

AI-generated keywords: Limb-darkening Exoplanet Kepler TESS Magnetic field

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Inaccurate limb-darkening models can cause errors in analyzing light curves for transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary star systems.
  • P.F.L. Maxted compared predicted limb-darkening profiles to those measured from high-quality light curves of 43 FGK-type stars in transiting exoplanet systems observed by Kepler and TESS missions.
  • Two parameters were used for comparison: $h^{\prime}_1 = I_{\lambda}(\frac{2}{3})$ and $h^{\prime}_2 = h^{\prime}_1 - I_{\lambda}(\frac{1}{3})$
  • Most tabulations of limb-darkening data agreed well with observed values of $h^{\prime}_1$ and $h^{\prime}_2$, but there was a small but significant offset $\Delta h^{\prime}_1 \approx 0.006$ compared to observed values that could be attributed to a mean vertical magnetic field strength $\approx 100$\,G expected in photospheres of inactive solar-type stars but not accounted for by typical stellar model atmospheres.
  • Accurate limb-darkening models are essential for determining accurate planetary radii from transit observations, which has implications for PLATO mission's precision measurements of planetary radii.
  • More precise models that account for magnetic fields in photospheres of solar-type stars are needed.
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: P. F. L. Maxted

arXiv: 2212.09117v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
12 pages, 11 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS

Abstract: Inaccurate limb-darkening models can be a significant source of error in the analysis of the light curves for transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary star systems. To test the accuracy of published limb-darkening models, I have compared limb-darkening profiles predicted by stellar atmosphere models to the limb-darkening profiles measured from high-quality light curves of 43 FGK-type stars in transiting exoplanet systems observed by the Kepler and TESS missions. The comparison is done using the parameters $h^{\prime}_1 = I_{\lambda}(\frac{2}{3})$ and $h^{\prime}_2 = h^{\prime}_1 - I_{\lambda}(\frac{1}{3})$, where $I_{\lambda}(\mu)$ is the specific intensity emitted in the direction $\mu$, the cosine of the angle between the line of sight and the surface normal vector. These parameters are straightforward to interpret and insensitive to the details of how they are computed. I find that most (but not all) tabulations of limb-darkening data agree well with the observed values of $h^{\prime}_1$ and $h^{\prime}_2$. There is a small but significant offset $\Delta h^{\prime}_1 \approx 0.006$ compared to the observed values that can be ascribed to the effect of a mean vertical magnetic field strength $\approx 100$\,G that is expected in the photospheres of these inactive solar-type stars but that is not accounted for by typical stellar model atmospheres. The implications of these results for the precision of planetary radii measured by the PLATO mission are discussed briefly.

Submitted to arXiv on 18 Dec. 2022

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the AI assistant only knows about the paper metadata rather than the full article.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2212.09117v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

Inaccurate limb-darkening models can introduce significant errors in the analysis of light curves for transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary star systems. To address this issue, P.F.L. Maxted compared limb-darkening profiles predicted by stellar atmosphere models to those measured from high-quality light curves of 43 FGK-type stars in transiting exoplanet systems observed by the Kepler and TESS missions. The comparison was done using two parameters: $h^{\prime}_1 = I_{\lambda}(\frac{2}{3})$ and $h^{\prime}_2 = h^{\prime}_1 - I_{\lambda}(\frac{1}{3})$, where $I_{\lambda}(\mu)$ is the specific intensity emitted in the direction $\mu$, the cosine of the angle between the line of sight and the surface normal vector. These parameters are straightforward to interpret and insensitive to how they are computed. Maxted found that most tabulations of limb-darkening data agreed well with observed values of $h^{\prime}_1$ and $h^{\prime}_2$. However, there was a small but significant offset $\Delta h^{\prime}_1 \approx 0.006$ compared to observed values that could be attributed to a mean vertical magnetic field strength $\approx 100$\,G expected in photospheres of inactive solar-type stars but not accounted for by typical stellar model atmospheres. These results have implications for PLATO mission's precision measurements of planetary radii as accurate limb-darkening models are essential for determining accurate planetary radii from transit observations. Therefore, these findings highlight the need for more precise models that account for magnetic fields in photospheres of solar-type stars. Overall, Maxted's study provides valuable insights into improving our understanding of limb-darkening effects on transit observations and emphasizes the importance of accurate modeling techniques when analyzing exoplanetary systems.
Created on 05 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.