What do Vision Transformers Learn? A Visual Exploration

AI-generated keywords: Vision Transformers Convolutional Neural Networks Feature Progression Spatial Information Visualizations

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Vision Transformers (ViTs) are popular for computer vision tasks
  • There is a lack of comprehensive understanding of how ViTs work and what they learn
  • Neurons in ViTs trained with language model supervision are activated by semantic concepts rather than visual features
  • ViTs and CNNs both detect image background features, but ViT predictions depend less on high-frequency information
  • Both architecture types exhibit similar behavior in terms of feature progression from abstract patterns to concrete objects
  • ViTs maintain spatial information in all layers except the final layer, which behaves as a learned global pooling operation and discards spatial information
  • Large-scale visualizations were conducted on various ViT variants to validate the method's effectiveness
  • This paper provides valuable insights into the workings of ViTs and sheds light on why they are becoming increasingly popular for computer vision tasks.
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Authors: Amin Ghiasi, Hamid Kazemi, Eitan Borgnia, Steven Reich, Manli Shu, Micah Goldblum, Andrew Gordon Wilson, Tom Goldstein

Abstract: Vision transformers (ViTs) are quickly becoming the de-facto architecture for computer vision, yet we understand very little about why they work and what they learn. While existing studies visually analyze the mechanisms of convolutional neural networks, an analogous exploration of ViTs remains challenging. In this paper, we first address the obstacles to performing visualizations on ViTs. Assisted by these solutions, we observe that neurons in ViTs trained with language model supervision (e.g., CLIP) are activated by semantic concepts rather than visual features. We also explore the underlying differences between ViTs and CNNs, and we find that transformers detect image background features, just like their convolutional counterparts, but their predictions depend far less on high-frequency information. On the other hand, both architecture types behave similarly in the way features progress from abstract patterns in early layers to concrete objects in late layers. In addition, we show that ViTs maintain spatial information in all layers except the final layer. In contrast to previous works, we show that the last layer most likely discards the spatial information and behaves as a learned global pooling operation. Finally, we conduct large-scale visualizations on a wide range of ViT variants, including DeiT, CoaT, ConViT, PiT, Swin, and Twin, to validate the effectiveness of our method.

Submitted to arXiv on 13 Dec. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2212.06727v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In recent years, Vision Transformers (ViTs) have emerged as the go-to architecture for computer vision tasks. However, despite their growing popularity, we still lack a comprehensive understanding of how ViTs work and what they learn. While previous studies have explored the mechanisms of Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), visualizing ViTs remains challenging. In this paper, authors Amin Ghiasi et al. address these challenges and provide insights into the workings of ViTs. The authors begin by observing that neurons in ViTs trained with language model supervision are activated by semantic concepts rather than visual features. They also investigate the differences between ViTs and CNNs and find that both architectures detect image background features but that ViT predictions depend far less on high-frequency information. Additionally, both architecture types exhibit similar behavior in terms of feature progression from abstract patterns in early layers to concrete objects in late layers. The authors further demonstrate that ViTs maintain spatial information in all layers except the final layer, which behaves as a learned global pooling operation and discards spatial information. This finding contrasts with previous works that suggested otherwise. To validate their method's effectiveness, the authors conduct large-scale visualizations on various ViT variants such as DeiT, CoaT, ConViT, PiT, Swin, and Twin. The results show that their approach is effective at revealing important insights into how ViTs work. Overall, this paper provides valuable insights into the workings of ViTs and sheds light on why they are becoming increasingly popular for computer vision tasks.
Created on 04 Apr. 2023

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