Energy-based Generative Models for Target-specific Drug Discovery

AI-generated keywords: Drug Discovery Generative Models TagMol GAT-based models GCN baseline

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Drug discovery involves identifying drug targets crucial in disease pathogenesis
  • Computational approaches are increasingly popular due to growing availability of biological molecular datasets
  • Generative models create new drug molecules by learning given molecule distributions but may not be suitable for target-specific drug discovery
  • Energy-based probabilistic model called TagMol developed for computational target-specific drug discovery
  • GAT-based models showed faster and better learning compared to GCN baseline models
  • TagMol enables researchers to generate novel compounds that specifically target certain diseases or conditions, potentially accelerating the drug development process and leading to more effective treatments
  • Developing target-specific generative models is important in drug discovery research to improve outcomes for patients with various diseases or conditions.
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Authors: Junde Li, Collin Beaudoin, Swaroop Ghosh

Abstract: Drug targets are the main focus of drug discovery due to their key role in disease pathogenesis. Computational approaches are widely applied to drug development because of the increasing availability of biological molecular datasets. Popular generative approaches can create new drug molecules by learning the given molecule distributions. However, these approaches are mostly not for target-specific drug discovery. We developed an energy-based probabilistic model for computational target-specific drug discovery. Results show that our proposed TagMol can generate molecules with similar binding affinity scores as real molecules. GAT-based models showed faster and better learning relative to GCN baseline models.

Submitted to arXiv on 05 Dec. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2212.02404v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

Drug discovery is a complex and challenging process that involves identifying drug targets which play a crucial role in disease pathogenesis. Computational approaches have become increasingly popular in drug development due to the growing availability of biological molecular datasets. Generative models are commonly used to create new drug molecules by learning the given molecule distributions. However, these models are not always suitable for target-specific drug discovery. To address this issue, Junde Li, Collin Beaudoin and Swaroop Ghosh developed an energy-based probabilistic model called TagMol for computational target-specific drug discovery. Their approach generates molecules with similar binding affinity scores as real molecules by focusing on specific targets. The authors found that their GAT-based models showed faster and better learning compared to GCN baseline models. The proposed method has significant implications for drug discovery as it enables researchers to generate novel compounds that specifically target certain diseases or conditions. This approach could potentially accelerate the drug development process and lead to more effective treatments for various illnesses. Overall, this study highlights the importance of developing target-specific generative models in drug discovery research which could help improve outcomes for patients suffering from various diseases or conditions.
Created on 08 Jun. 2023

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