Magnetar spin-down glitch clearing the way for FRB-like bursts and a pulsed radio episode

AI-generated keywords: Magnetars Spin-down Glitches FRBs Radio Bursts Pulsed Radio Emission

AI-generated Key Points

  • Magnetars are a subset of isolated neutron stars that emit X-ray and radio waves due to the decay of their magnetic fields.
  • A recent study detected a significant spin-down glitch event from the magnetar SGR~1935+2154 on October 5th, 2020.
  • The glitch did not result in any changes to the source's persistent surface thermal or magnetospheric X-ray behavior nor evidence of strong X-ray bursting activity.
  • Following the spin-down glitch event, SGR~1935+2154 emitted three FRB-like radio bursts followed by a month-long episode of pulsed radio emission.
  • The synchronicity between these events suggests an association between them that could provide pivotal clues to their origin and triggering mechanisms with ramifications for broader magnetar and FRB populations.
  • Impulsive crustal plasma shedding close to the magnetic pole generates a wind that combs out magnetic field lines rapidly reducing the star's angular momentum while temporarily altering its magnetospheric field geometry to permit pair creation needed for precipitating radio emission.
  • This study sheds light on powerful winds generated by impulsive crustal plasma shedding near magnetic poles that can lead to FRB-like bursts and pulsed radio emission in magnetars.
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Authors: G. Younes (NASA/GSFC), M. G. Baring (Rice University), A. K. Harding (LANL), T. Enoto (RIKEN), Z. Wadiasingh (NASA/GSFC), A. B. Pearlman (McGill University), W. C. G. Ho (Haverford College), S. Guillot (IRAP), Z. Arzoumanian (NASA/GSFC), A. Borghese (ICE, CSIC), K. Gendreau (NASA/GSFC), E. Gogus (Sabanci University), T. Guver (Istanbul University), A. J. van der Horst (GWU), C. -P. Hu (National Changhua University of Education), G. K. Jaisawal (Technical University of Denmark), C. Kouveliotou (GWU), L. Lin (Beijing Normal University), W. A. Majid (JPL)

arXiv: 2210.11518v1 - DOI (astro-ph.HE)
51 pages, 3 tables, 8 figures. Accepted for publication in Nature Astronomy
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: Magnetars are a special subset of the isolated neutron star family, with X-ray and radio emission mainly powered by the decay of their immense magnetic fields. Many attributes of magnetars remain poorly understood: spin-down glitches or the sudden reductions in the star's angular momentum, radio bursts reminiscent of extra-galactic Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), and transient pulsed radio emission lasting months to years. Here we unveil the detection of a large spin-down glitch event ($|\Delta\nu/\nu| = 5.8_{-1.6}^{+2.6}\times10^{-6}$) from the magnetar SGR~1935+2154 on 2020 October 5 (+/- 1 day). We find no change to the source persistent surface thermal or magnetospheric X-ray behavior, nor is there evidence of strong X-ray bursting activity. Yet, in the subsequent days, the magnetar emitted three FRB-like radio bursts followed by a month long episode of pulsed radio emission. Given the rarity of spin-down glitches and radio signals from magnetars, their approximate synchronicity suggests an association, providing pivotal clues to their origin and triggering mechanisms, with ramifications to the broader magnetar and FRB populations. We postulate that impulsive crustal plasma shedding close to the magnetic pole generates a wind that combs out magnetic field lines, rapidly reducing the star's angular momentum, while temporarily altering the magnetospheric field geometry to permit the pair creation needed to precipitate radio emission.

Submitted to arXiv on 20 Oct. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2210.11518v1

Magnetars are a unique subset of isolated neutron stars that emit X-ray and radio waves primarily due to the decay of their massive magnetic fields. In a recent study, researchers unveiled the detection of a large spin-down glitch event from the magnetar SGR~1935+2154 on October 5th, 2020. The glitch was significant with $|\Delta\nu/\nu| = 5.8_{-1.6}^{+2.6}\times10^{-6}$ but did not result in any changes to the source's persistent surface thermal or magnetospheric X-ray behavior nor evidence of strong X-ray bursting activity. However, in the days following the spin-down glitch event, SGR~1935+2154 emitted three FRB-like radio bursts followed by a month-long episode of pulsed radio emission. Given the rarity of both spin-down glitches and radio signals from magnetars, their approximate synchronicity suggests an association between these events that could provide pivotal clues to their origin and triggering mechanisms with ramifications for broader magnetar and FRB populations. The researchers postulate that impulsive crustal plasma shedding close to the magnetic pole generates a wind that combs out magnetic field lines rapidly reducing the star's angular momentum while temporarily altering its magnetospheric field geometry to permit pair creation needed for precipitating radio emission. This study sheds light on powerful winds generated by impulsive crustal plasma shedding near magnetic poles that can lead to FRB-like bursts and pulsed radio emission in magnetars. These findings have important implications for our understanding of these enigmatic objects and could help us unravel some of their mysteries.
Created on 17 Apr. 2023

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