CoRe: An Automated Pipeline for The Prediction of Liver Resection Complexity from Preoperative CT Scans

AI-generated keywords: Liver Cancer Surgical Resection Imaging Biomarkers Automated Medical Image Processing Complex LRs

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Liver cancer is a serious health concern and surgical resections are the most common curative treatment for primary liver cancer.
  • Tumors located in critical positions can make liver resections complex and increase the risk of intra- and postoperative complications.
  • CoRe is an automated medical image processing pipeline that predicts postoperative liver resection (LR) complexity from preoperative CT scans using imaging biomarkers.
  • The CoRe pipeline segments the liver, lesions, and vessels with two deep learning networks and prunes the liver vasculature to define the hepatic central zone (HCZ).
  • From HCZ, a new imaging biomarker called BHCZ is derived along with additional biomarkers used to train and evaluate an LR complexity prediction model.
  • An ablation study shows that HCZ-based biomarkers are essential in predicting LR complexity with an accuracy of 77.3%, F1 score of 75.4%, and AUC of 84.1%.
  • This approach could help improve standard care by reducing intra- and postoperative complications associated with complex LRs while also providing guidance for surgical planning in specialized medical centers where experienced surgeons may not be available or accessible.
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Authors: Omar Ali, Alexandre Bone, Caterina Accardo, Omar Belkouchi, Marc-Michel Rohe, Eric Vibert, Irene Vignon-Clementel

Accepted by the MIABID workshop at MICCAI 2022

Abstract: Surgical resections are the most prevalent curative treatment for primary liver cancer. Tumors located in critical positions are known to complexify liver resections (LR). While experienced surgeons in specialized medical centers may have the necessary expertise to accurately anticipate LR complexity, and prepare accordingly, an objective method able to reproduce this behavior would have the potential to improve the standard routine of care, and avoid intra- and postoperative complications. In this article, we propose CoRe, an automated medical image processing pipeline for the prediction of postoperative LR complexity from preoperative CT scans, using imaging biomarkers. The CoRe pipeline first segments the liver, lesions, and vessels with two deep learning networks. The liver vasculature is then pruned based on a topological criterion to define the hepatic central zone (HCZ), a convex volume circumscribing the major liver vessels, from which a new imaging biomarker, BHCZ is derived. Additional biomarkers are extracted and leveraged to train and evaluate a LR complexity prediction model. An ablation study shows the HCZ-based biomarker as the central feature in predicting LR complexity. The best predictive model reaches an accuracy, F1, and AUC of 77.3, 75.4, and 84.1% respectively.

Submitted to arXiv on 15 Oct. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2210.08318v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

Liver cancer is a serious health concern and surgical resections are the most common curative treatment for primary liver cancer. However, tumors located in critical positions can make liver resections complex and increase the risk of intra- and postoperative complications. To address this need, a team of researchers led by Omar Ali has proposed CoRe - an automated medical image processing pipeline that predicts postoperative liver resection (LR) complexity from preoperative CT scans using imaging biomarkers. The CoRe pipeline first segments the liver, lesions, and vessels with two deep learning networks. Then, based on a topological criterion it prunes the liver vasculature to define the hepatic central zone (HCZ), which is a convex volume circumscribing major liver vessels. From HCZ, a new imaging biomarker called BHCZ is derived. Additional biomarkers are extracted and used to train and evaluate an LR complexity prediction model. An ablation study shows that HCZ-based biomarkers are essential in predicting LR complexity with an accuracy of 77.3%, F1 score of 75.4%, and AUC of 84.1%. This approach could help improve standard care by reducing intra- and postoperative complications associated with complex LRs while also providing guidance for surgical planning in specialized medical centers where experienced surgeons may not be available or accessible. Overall, this research presents a promising step forward towards developing automated tools that can assist clinicians in making informed decisions about patient care while also improving outcomes for patients undergoing complex surgical procedures like LRs for primary liver cancer.
Created on 08 Apr. 2023

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