Debiased Large Language Models Still Associate Muslims with Uniquely Violent Acts

AI-generated keywords: GPT-3 Bias Violent Debias Religion

AI-generated Key Points

  • GPT-3 language model shows bias towards generating violent text completions when prompted about Muslims compared to Christians and Hindus
  • Recent pre-registered replication attempts show weak bias in the more recent Instruct Series version of GPT-3, which has been fine-tuned to eliminate biased and toxic outputs
  • Using common names associated with religions in prompts yielded a highly significant increase in violent completions, indicating a stronger second-order bias against Muslims
  • Names of Muslim celebrities from non-violent domains resulted in relatively fewer violent completions, suggesting that access to individualized information can steer the model away from using stereotypes
  • Content analysis reveals religion-specific violent themes containing highly offensive ideas regardless of prompt format
  • Further debiasing of large language models is needed to address higher-order schemas and associations
  • Even after debiasing efforts, such models still associate Muslims with uniquely violent acts
  • Continued research into mitigating biases within AI systems and promoting ethical AI practices is important for ensuring fairness and accuracy in machine learning applications.
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Authors: Babak Hemmatian, Lav R. Varshney

6 pages, 1 figure, 3 tables
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: Recent work demonstrates a bias in the GPT-3 model towards generating violent text completions when prompted about Muslims, compared with Christians and Hindus. Two pre-registered replication attempts, one exact and one approximate, found only the weakest bias in the more recent Instruct Series version of GPT-3, fine-tuned to eliminate biased and toxic outputs. Few violent completions were observed. Additional pre-registered experiments, however, showed that using common names associated with the religions in prompts yields a highly significant increase in violent completions, also revealing a stronger second-order bias against Muslims. Names of Muslim celebrities from non-violent domains resulted in relatively fewer violent completions, suggesting that access to individualized information can steer the model away from using stereotypes. Nonetheless, content analysis revealed religion-specific violent themes containing highly offensive ideas regardless of prompt format. Our results show the need for additional debiasing of large language models to address higher-order schemas and associations.

Submitted to arXiv on 08 Aug. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2208.04417v2

The GPT-3 language model has been found to exhibit a bias towards generating violent text completions when prompted about Muslims compared to Christians and Hindus. Recent pre-registered replication attempts have shown only weak bias in the more recent Instruct Series version of GPT-3, which has been fine-tuned to eliminate biased and toxic outputs. Additional experiments revealed that using common names associated with religions in prompts yielded a highly significant increase in violent completions, indicating a stronger second-order bias against Muslims. Interestingly, names of Muslim celebrities from non-violent domains resulted in relatively fewer violent completions, suggesting that access to individualized information can steer the model away from using stereotypes. Despite these findings, content analysis revealed religion-specific violent themes containing highly offensive ideas regardless of prompt format. These results highlight the need for further debiasing of large language models to address higher-order schemas and associations. It is concerning that even after debiasing efforts, such models still associate Muslims with uniquely violent acts. This study underscores the importance of continued research into mitigating biases within AI systems and promoting ethical AI practices to ensure fairness and accuracy in machine learning applications.
Created on 29 Apr. 2023

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