Diegetic Representation Of Feedback In Open Games

AI-generated keywords: Open Games Agency Payoff Function Nash Equilibria Gradient-Based Learners

AI-generated Key Points

  • Matteo Capucci addresses conceptual flaws in the framework of open games with agency
  • Describes entirety of play, payoff distribution, and players' counterfactual analysis within the dynamics of the game system itself
  • Introduces two fundamental innovations:
  • Replacing S and R in Figure 1a with PX and PY to reproduce information on payoffs available at each stage of a sequential or concurrent game
  • Describing players' counterfactual analysis giving rise to Nash equilibria within the dynamics of the game itself (hence diegetically)
  • Feedback propagation in games can be seen as reverse-mode differentiation, with a crucial difference explaining non-cooperative games' distinctive character phenomenology
  • Functorial construction of an arena of games where players form a subsystem over it and proves that their "fixpoint behaviours" are Nash equilibria
  • Corrects previous problems by describing all aspects of play within the dynamics of the game system itself rather than outside it
  • Significant contributions to both theoretical computer science and economics by providing new insights into how open games with agency should be modeled and analyzed.
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Authors: Matteo Capucci

17 pages, 4 figures
License: CC BY-SA 4.0

Abstract: We improve the framework of open games with agency by showing how the players' counterfactual analysis giving rise to Nash equilibria can be described in the dynamics of the game itself (hence diegetically), getting rid of devices such as equilibrium predicates. This new approach overlaps almost completely with the way gradient-based learners are specified and trained. Indeed, we show feedback propagation in games can be seen as reverse-mode differentiation, with a crucial difference explaining the distinctive character of the phenomenology of non-cooperative games. We outline a functorial construction of arena of games, show players form a subsystem over it, and prove that their `fixpoint behaviours' are Nash equilibria.

Submitted to arXiv on 24 Jun. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2206.12338v2

In this paper, Matteo Capucci addresses the conceptual flaws in the framework of open games with agency by describing the entirety of play, payoff distribution, and players' counterfactual analysis diegetically within the dynamics of the game system itself. The author introduces two fundamental innovations to achieve this goal. Firstly, feedback propagating in an open game must contain information about the entirety of the payoff function of the game. Therefore, Capucci replaces S and R in Figure 1a with PX and PY, where P is a specified payoff object. This allows for coplay to be defined functorially from play as precomposition with a partially-evaluated play. This mechanism reproduces information on payoffs available at each stage of a sequential or concurrent game. Additionally, Capucci recognizes that the lax monoidal structure of this approach plays a crucial role in defining feedback propagation. Secondly, Capucci shows how players' counterfactual analysis giving rise to Nash equilibria can be described within the dynamics of the game itself (hence diegetically), getting rid of devices such as equilibrium predicates. This new approach overlaps almost completely with gradient-based learners' way of being specified and trained. Feedback propagation in games can be seen as reverse-mode differentiation, with a crucial difference explaining non-cooperative games' distinctive character phenomenology. The author outlines a functorial construction of an arena of games where players form a subsystem over it and proves that their "fixpoint behaviours" are Nash equilibria. By doing so, Capucci corrects previous problems by describing all aspects of play within the dynamics of the game system itself rather than outside it. This work has significant contributions to both theoretical computer science and economics by providing new insights into how open games with agency should be modeled and analyzed. It also sheds light on how gradient-based learners operate and how they relate to non-cooperative games' phenomenology. Overall, this paper provides a comprehensive and innovative approach to modeling open games with agency which can be applied in various fields.
Created on 14 Apr. 2023

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