Vertical evolution of exocometary gas: I. How vertical diffusion shortens the CO lifetime

AI-generated keywords: Exocometary gas CO CI Vertical mixing Shielding efficiency

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Exocometary gas study is important for understanding planetary system formation and evolution.
  • Bright debris discs contain large amounts of CO gas, which was initially thought to be a protoplanetary remnant.
  • Recent research shows that CO could be released in collisions of volatile-rich solids.
  • Interstellar UV radiation photodissociates CO producing CI, which can shield CO allowing a large CO mass to accumulate.
  • CI is inefficient at shielding if CO and CI are vertically mixed.
  • The vertical evolution of gas was studied for the first time to determine how vertical mixing affects the efficiency of shielding by CI.
  • A 1D model was presented that accounts for gas release, photodissociation, ionisation, viscous evolution, and vertical mixing due to turbulent diffusion.
  • If the gas surface density is high and the vertical diffusion weak ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha<[H/r]^2$), CO photodissociates high above the midplane forming an optically thick CI layer that shields the CO underneath. Conversely, if diffusion is strong ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha>[H/r]^2$), CI and CO become well mixed shortening the lifetime of CO.
  • Diffusion could also limit dust settling.
  • High-resolution ALMA observations could resolve the vertical distribution of CO and CI and thus constrain vertical mixing and the efficiency of CI shielding.
  • The researchers found that the CO and CI scale heights may not be good probes of the mean molecular weight or composition of gas.
  • Strong enough mixing might shorten the lifetime of CO so it cannot spread interior to where gas is produced in planetesimal belts.
  • This study provides crucial insights into exocometary gas's vertical evolution and its effect on shielding efficiency by CI with significant implications for our understanding of planetary system formation and evolution.
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Authors: S. Marino, G. Cataldi, M. R. Jankovic, L. Matrà, M. C. Wyatt

arXiv: 2206.11071v2 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
Accepted for publication in MNRAS (18 pages, 14 figures)

Abstract: Bright debris discs can contain large amounts of CO gas. This gas was thought to be a protoplanetary remnant until it was recently shown that it could be released in collisions of volatile-rich solids. As CO is released, interstellar UV radiation photodissociates CO producing CI, which can shield CO allowing a large CO mass to accumulate. However, this picture was challenged because CI is inefficient at shielding if CO and CI are vertically mixed. Here, we study for the first time the vertical evolution of gas to determine how vertical mixing affects the efficiency of shielding by CI. We present a 1D model that accounts for gas release, photodissociation, ionisation, viscous evolution, and vertical mixing due to turbulent diffusion. We find that if the gas surface density is high and the vertical diffusion weak ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha<[H/r]^2$) CO photodissociates high above the midplane, forming an optically thick CI layer that shields the CO underneath. Conversely, if diffusion is strong ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha>[H/r]^2$) CI and CO become well mixed, shortening the CO lifetime. Moreover, diffusion could also limit the amount of dust settling. High-resolution ALMA observations could resolve the vertical distribution of CO and CI, and thus constrain vertical mixing and the efficiency of CI shielding. We also find that the CO and CI scale heights may not be good probes of the mean molecular weight, and thus composition, of the gas. Finally, we show that if mixing is strong the CO lifetime might not be long enough for CO to spread interior to the planetesimal belt where gas is produced.

Submitted to arXiv on 22 Jun. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2206.11071v2

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The study of exocometary gas is essential in understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems. Bright debris discs have been found to contain large amounts of CO gas, which was initially thought to be a protoplanetary remnant. However, recent research has shown that it could be released in collisions of volatile-rich solids. As CO is released, interstellar UV radiation photodissociates CO producing CI, which can shield CO allowing a large CO mass to accumulate. However, this picture was challenged because CI is inefficient at shielding if CO and CI are vertically mixed. In this study, conducted by S. Marino et al., the vertical evolution of gas was studied for the first time to determine how vertical mixing affects the efficiency of shielding by CI. The researchers presented a 1D model that accounts for gas release, photodissociation, ionisation, viscous evolution, and vertical mixing due to turbulent diffusion. They found that if the gas surface density is high and the vertical diffusion weak ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha<[H/r]^2$), CO photodissociates high above the midplane forming an optically thick CI layer that shields the CO underneath. Conversely, if diffusion is strong ($\alpha_{\rm v}/\alpha>[H/r]^2$), CI and CO become well mixed shortening the lifetime of CO. Moreover, diffusion could also limit the amount of dust settling. High-resolution ALMA observations could resolve the vertical distribution of CO and CI and thus constrain vertical mixing and the efficiency of CI shielding. The researchers also found that the CO and CI scale heights may not be good probes of the mean molecular weight or composition of gas. Finally, they showed that if mixing is strong enough then the lifetime of CO might not be long enough for it to spread interior to where gas is produced in planetesimal belts. This study provides crucial insights into the vertical evolution of exocometary gas and how it affects the shielding efficiency of CI. The findings could have significant implications for our understanding of planetary system formation and evolution.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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