German AI Start-Ups and AI Ethics: Using A Social Practice Lens for Assessing and Implementing Socio-Technical Innovation

AI-generated keywords: AI Ethics Empirical Research Socio-technical Innovation Cultural Contexts Fairness Accountability Transparency

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The field of AI ethics lacks empirical research on how ethical concerns are understood and implemented in start-ups
  • This gap can lead to a disconnect between scholarly research, innovation, and application
  • There is an urgent need for socio-technical innovation that prioritizes fairness, accountability, and transparency in AI systems
  • The authors propose a framework based on social practice theory to systematically analyze cultural understandings, histories, and social practices related to ethical AI
  • Empirical findings from their study on the operationalization of ethics in German AI start-ups emphasize the importance of understanding AI ethics and social practices within specific cultural and historical contexts
  • Their contributions are threefold: introducing a practice-based approach for understanding ethical AI; presenting empirical findings that highlight the importance of contextualizing ethical considerations within specific cultural contexts; suggesting breaking down ethical AI practices into principles, needs, narratives, materializations and cultural genealogies as a useful backdrop for considering socio-technical innovations.
  • This paper provides valuable insights into how socio-technical innovations can be implemented effectively by analyzing existing cultural understandings and social practices related to ethical AI.
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Authors: Mona Sloane, Janina Zakrzewski

License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract: Within the current AI ethics discourse, there is a gap in empirical research on understanding how AI practitioners understand ethics and socially organize to operationalize ethical concerns, particularly in the context of AI start-ups. This gap intensifies the risk of a disconnect between scholarly research, innovation, and application. This risk materializes acutely as mounting pressures to identify and mitigate the potential harms of AI systems have created an urgent need to assess and implement socio-technical innovation for fairness, accountability, and transparency. Building on social practice theory, we address this need via a framework that allows AI researchers, practitioners, and regulators to systematically analyze existing cultural understandings, histories, and social practices of ethical AI to define appropriate strategies for effectively implementing socio-technical innovations. Our contributions are threefold: 1) we introduce a practice-based approach for understanding ethical AI; 2) we present empirical findings from our study on the operationalization of ethics in German AI start-ups to underline that AI ethics and social practices must be understood in their specific cultural and historical contexts; and 3) based on our empirical findings, we suggest that ethical AI practices can be broken down into principles, needs, narratives, materializations, and cultural genealogies to form a useful backdrop for considering socio-technical innovations.

Submitted to arXiv on 20 Jun. 2022

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2206.09978v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The field of AI ethics is currently lacking empirical research on how AI practitioners understand and implement ethical concerns, particularly in the context of start-ups. This gap poses a significant risk of disconnect between scholarly research, innovation, and application. With mounting pressures to identify and mitigate potential harms of AI systems, there is an urgent need for socio-technical innovation that prioritizes fairness, accountability, and transparency. To address this need, the authors propose a framework based on social practice theory that allows researchers, practitioners, and regulators to systematically analyze cultural understandings, histories, and social practices related to ethical AI. The authors present empirical findings from their study on the operationalization of ethics in German AI start-ups to emphasize the importance of understanding AI ethics and social practices within specific cultural and historical contexts. Their contributions are threefold: firstly they introduce a practice-based approach for understanding ethical AI; secondly they present empirical findings that highlight the importance of contextualizing ethical considerations within specific cultural contexts; finally based on their empirical findings they suggest breaking down ethical AI practices into principles, needs, narratives, materializations and cultural genealogies as a useful backdrop for considering socio-technical innovations. Overall this paper provides valuable insights into how socio-technical innovations can be implemented effectively by analyzing existing cultural understandings and social practices related to ethical AI. By doing so it will help bridge the gap between scholarly research and practical application while ensuring that fairness accountability transparency are prioritized in future developments in this field.
Created on 30 May. 2023

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