Rheumatoid Arthritis: Automated Scoring of Radiographic Joint Damage

AI-generated keywords: Rheumatoid Arthritis Radiographs Deep Learning Automated Tool Diagnosis

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes joint inflammation and damage.
  • Early detection of joint damage is crucial for effective treatment and prevention of further bone structure damage.
  • Radiographs are commonly used to assess the extent of joint damage, but scoring requires expertise, effort, and time.
  • Yan Ming Tan, Raphael Quek Hao Chong, and Carol Anne Hargreaves developed a pipeline of deep learning models to automatically identify and score rheumatoid arthritic joint damage from radiographic images.
  • Their automatic tool produces scores with extremely high balanced accuracy within a couple of minutes, eliminating subjectivity between human reviewers.
  • This automated approach could significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis by providing objective measurements for assessing joint damage severity.
  • The authors' work represents an important step towards developing more accurate diagnostic tools for rheumatoid arthritis patients that can lead to earlier interventions and improved outcomes.
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Authors: Yan Ming Tan, Raphael Quek Hao Chong, Carol Anne Hargreaves

License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that causes joint damage due to inflammation in the soft tissue lining the joints known as the synovium. It is vital to identify joint damage as soon as possible to provide necessary treatment early and prevent further damage to the bone structures. Radiographs are often used to assess the extent of the joint damage. Currently, the scoring of joint damage from the radiograph takes expertise, effort, and time. Joint damage associated with rheumatoid arthritis is also not quantitated in clinical practice and subjective descriptors are used. In this work, we describe a pipeline of deep learning models to automatically identify and score rheumatoid arthritic joint damage from a radiographic image. Our automatic tool was shown to produce scores with extremely high balanced accuracy within a couple of minutes and utilizing this would remove the subjectivity of the scores between human reviewers.

Submitted to arXiv on 17 Oct. 2021

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2110.08812v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic autoimmune disease that causes inflammation in the synovial membrane, leading to joint damage and deformity. Early detection of joint damage is crucial for effective treatment and prevention of further bone structure damage. Radiographs are commonly used to assess the extent of joint damage; however, scoring the severity of joint damage from radiographs requires expertise, effort, and time. To address these challenges, Yan Ming Tan, Raphael Quek Hao Chong, and Carol Anne Hargreaves have developed a pipeline of deep learning models that can automatically identify and score rheumatoid arthritic joint damage from radiographic images. Their automatic tool has been shown to produce scores with extremely high balanced accuracy within a couple of minutes. By utilizing this tool, the subjectivity of scores between human reviewers can be eliminated. This automated approach could significantly improve the efficiency and accuracy of diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis by providing objective measurements for assessing joint damage severity. The authors' work represents an important step towards developing more accurate diagnostic tools for rheumatoid arthritis patients that can lead to earlier interventions and improved outcomes.
Created on 28 Apr. 2023

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