Chaos in self-gravitating many-body systems: Lyapunov time dependence of $N$ and the influence of general relativity

AI-generated keywords: Chaotic behavior Lyapunov time General Relativity N-body codes Exponential growth

AI-generated Key Points

  • The study explores chaotic behavior of self-gravitating many-body systems and investigates the Lyapunov time dependence on the number of bodies (N) and the influence of general relativity.
  • Small perturbations introduced at the start or due to numerical errors grow exponentially with time in Newtonian gravity.
  • For relatively homogeneous systems, the rate of growth per crossing time increases with N up to N ~ 30, but for larger systems, the growth rate has a weaker scaling with N. However, for concentrated systems, the rate of exponential growth continues to scale with N.
  • In relativistic self-gravitating systems, the rate of growth is almost independent of N but only noticeable when the system's mean velocity approaches the speed of light within three orders of magnitude.
  • Chaotic behavior in systems with more than a dozen bodies is qualitatively different when only solving pairwise interactions in Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann equations compared to taking into account interaction terms (or cross terms).
  • The research was made possible by open-source packages and libraries such as Python, MPI, AMUSE, Sapporo GPU library, MPFR library. All N-body codes used in this study are available in AMUSE repository at amusecode.org.
  • The calculations using Brutus took about 107 CPU seconds while other two sets were comparable totaling about a year.
  • This project was supported by funds from European Research Council (ERC) under Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 638435 (GalNUC), National Science Foundation under grant AST-1814772. It was performed using resources provided by Academic Leiden Interdisciplinary Cluster Environment (ALICE) and LGM-II (NWO grant # 621.016.701).
  • The authors acknowledge discussions with Clifford Will, Ina Sellentin, and Arend Moerman.
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: Simon F. Portegies Zwart (Leiden Observatory), Tjarda C. N. Boekholt (Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford), Emiel Por (STScI), Adrian S. Hamers (MPI), Steve L. W. McMillan (Drexel)

A&A 659, A86 (2022)
A&A in press
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: In self-gravitating $N$-body systems, small perturbations introduced at the start, or infinitesimal errors that are produced by the numerical integrator or are due to limited precision in the computer, grow exponentially with time. For Newton's gravity, we confirm earlier results that for relatively homogeneous systems, this rate of growth per crossing time increases with $N$ up to $N \sim 30$, but that for larger systems, the growth rate has a weaker scaling with $N$. For concentrated systems, however, the rate of exponential growth continues to scale with $N$. In relativistic self-gravitating systems, the rate of growth is almost independent of $N$. This effect, however, is only noticeable when the system's mean velocity approaches the speed of light to within three orders of magnitude. The chaotic behavior of systems with more than a dozen bodies for the usually adopted approximation of only solving the pairwise interactions in the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann equation of motion is qualitatively different than when the interaction terms (or cross terms) are taken into account. This result provides a strong motivation for follow-up studies on the microscopic effect of general relativity on orbital chaos, and on the influence of higher-order cross-terms in the Taylor-series expansion of the Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann equations of motion.

Submitted to arXiv on 22 Sep. 2021

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2109.11012v2

This study explores the chaotic behavior of self-gravitating many-body systems and investigates the Lyapunov time dependence on the number of bodies ($N$) and the influence of general relativity. The researchers confirm earlier findings that small perturbations introduced at the start or due to numerical errors grow exponentially with time in Newtonian gravity. They observe that for relatively homogeneous systems, this rate of growth per crossing time increases with $N$ up to $N \sim 30$, but for larger systems, the growth rate has a weaker scaling with $N$. However, for concentrated systems, the rate of exponential growth continues to scale with $N$. In relativistic self-gravitating systems, they find that the rate of growth is almost independent of $N$, but this effect is only noticeable when the system's mean velocity approaches the speed of light within three orders of magnitude. The study also highlights that chaotic behavior in systems with more than a dozen bodies is qualitatively different when only solving pairwise interactions in Einstein-Infeld-Hoffmann equations compared to taking into account interaction terms (or cross terms). This finding motivates further studies on the microscopic effect of general relativity on orbital chaos and higher-order cross-terms in Taylor-series expansion. The research was made possible by open-source packages and libraries such as Python, MPI, AMUSE, Sapporo GPU library, MPFR library. All N-body codes used in this study are available in AMUSE repository at amusecode.org. The calculations using Brutus took about 107 CPU seconds while other two sets were comparable totaling about a year. This project was supported by funds from European Research Council (ERC) under Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No 638435 (GalNUC), National Science Foundation under grant AST-1814772. It was performed using resources provided by Academic Leiden Interdisciplinary Cluster Environment (ALICE) and LGM-II (NWO grant # 621.016.701). The authors acknowledge discussions with Clifford Will, Ina Sellentin, and Arend Moerman.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.