Fair Representation: Guaranteeing Approximate Multiple Group Fairness for Unknown Tasks

AI-generated keywords: Fair Representation Group Fairness Maximum Mean Discrepancy Pretext Loss Two-Player Game

AI-generated Key Points

  • Fair representation can guarantee fairness for unknown prediction tasks and multiple fairness notions simultaneously.
  • Seven group fairness notions are considered, covering independence, separation, and calibration concepts.
  • Approximate fairness is explored and fair representation is proven to guarantee fairness for a subset of tasks where the representation is discriminative.
  • All seven group fairness notions are linearly controlled by the representation's fairness and discriminativeness.
  • When incompatibility exists between different notions, fair and discriminative representation satisfies all approximately.
  • Pretext loss is proposed to self-supervise learning important semantics, while Maximum Mean Discrepancy serves as a fair regularizer in a constrained optimization problem solved using a two-player game approach to learn both fair and discriminative representations.
  • Experiments on tabular, image, and face datasets show downstream predictions become fairer for all seven group fairness notions using the learned representation.
  • Theoretical findings provide valid fairness guarantees for these experiments.
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Authors: Xudong Shen, Yongkang Wong, Mohan Kankanhalli

published in TPAMI
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: Motivated by scenarios where data is used for diverse prediction tasks, we study whether fair representation can be used to guarantee fairness for unknown tasks and for multiple fairness notions simultaneously. We consider seven group fairness notions that cover the concepts of independence, separation, and calibration. Against the backdrop of the fairness impossibility results, we explore approximate fairness. We prove that, although fair representation might not guarantee fairness for all prediction tasks, it does guarantee fairness for an important subset of tasks -- the tasks for which the representation is discriminative. Specifically, all seven group fairness notions are linearly controlled by fairness and discriminativeness of the representation. When an incompatibility exists between different fairness notions, fair and discriminative representation hits the sweet spot that approximately satisfies all notions. Motivated by our theoretical findings, we propose to learn both fair and discriminative representations using pretext loss which self-supervises learning, and Maximum Mean Discrepancy as a fair regularizer. Experiments on tabular, image, and face datasets show that using the learned representation, downstream predictions that we are unaware of when learning the representation indeed become fairer for seven group fairness notions, and the fairness guarantees computed from our theoretical results are all valid.

Submitted to arXiv on 01 Sep. 2021

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2109.00545v2

This paper explores the use of fair representation to guarantee fairness for unknown prediction tasks and multiple fairness notions simultaneously. The authors consider seven group fairness notions that cover independence, separation, and calibration concepts. Despite the backdrop of fairness impossibility results, they explore approximate fairness and prove that fair representation guarantees fairness for a subset of tasks where the representation is discriminative. All seven group fairness notions are linearly controlled by the representation's fairness and discriminativeness. When an incompatibility exists between different notions, fair and discriminative representation satisfies all approximately. To learn both fair and discriminative representations, they propose using pretext loss to self-supervise learning important semantics and Maximum Mean Discrepancy as a fair regularizer in a constrained optimization problem solved using a two-player game approach. Experiments on tabular, image, and face datasets show downstream predictions become fairer for all seven group fairness notions using the learned representation. The authors' theoretical findings provide valid fairness guarantees for these experiments. Overall, this work provides insights into how to achieve approximate multiple group fairness in unknown prediction tasks with fair representations while addressing incompatibilities between different notions of group fairness.
Created on 04 May. 2023

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