Predicting Exporters with Machine Learning

AI-generated keywords: Machine Learning Exporters BART-MIA Trade Promotion Cash Resources

AI-generated Key Points

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  • Francesca Micocci and Armando Rungi explore the use of machine learning techniques to predict the likelihood of firms becoming successful exporters.
  • The authors train and test various algorithms using financial information on both exporters and non-exporters in France from 2010-2018.
  • A Bayesian Additive Regression Tree with Missingness In Attributes (BART-MIA) performs better than other techniques, with an accuracy of up to 0.90.
  • Predictions are robust to changes in definitions of exporters and in the presence of discontinuous exporting activity.
  • Exporting scores can be useful for trade promotion, trade credit, and assessing aggregate trade potential.
  • A representative firm with just below-average exporting scores needs up to 44% more cash resources and up to 2.5 times more capital to enter foreign markets.
  • Machine learning techniques can aid in predicting export success for firms by providing valuable insights for policymakers and businesses alike.
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Authors: Francesca Micocci, Armando Rungi

License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract: In this contribution, we exploit machine learning techniques to evaluate whether and how close firms are to becoming successful exporters. First, we train and test various algorithms using financial information on both exporters and non-exporters in France in 2010-2018. Thus, we show that we are able to predict the distance of non-exporters from export status. In particular, we find that a Bayesian Additive Regression Tree with Missingness In Attributes (BART-MIA) performs better than other techniques with an accuracy of up to 0.90. Predictions are robust to changes in definitions of exporters and in the presence of discontinuous exporting activity. Eventually, we discuss how our exporting scores can be helpful for trade promotion, trade credit, and assessing aggregate trade potential. For example, back-of-the-envelope estimates show that a representative firm with just below-average exporting scores needs up to 44% more cash resources and up to 2.5 times more capital to get to foreign markets.

Submitted to arXiv on 06 Jul. 2021

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2107.02512v2

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In their paper "Predicting Exporters with Machine Learning," Francesca Micocci and Armando Rungi explore the use of machine learning techniques to predict the likelihood of firms becoming successful exporters. The authors train and test various algorithms using financial information on both exporters and non-exporters in France from 2010-2018, ultimately demonstrating their ability to predict the distance of non-exporters from export status. They find that a Bayesian Additive Regression Tree with Missingness In Attributes (BART-MIA) performs better than other techniques, with an accuracy of up to 0.90, and note that predictions are robust to changes in definitions of exporters and in the presence of discontinuous exporting activity. The authors also discuss how their exporting scores can be useful for trade promotion, trade credit, and assessing aggregate trade potential. For instance, they estimate that a representative firm with just below-average exporting scores needs up to 44% more cash resources and up to 2.5 times more capital to enter foreign markets. This highlights the potential for machine learning techniques to aid in predicting export success for firms by providing valuable insights for policymakers and businesses alike. Overall, this study provides evidence for the effectiveness of these methods in helping companies make informed decisions about entering international markets.
Created on 24 Apr. 2023

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