The evolution of the solar wind

AI-generated keywords: Solar Wind Evolution Stellar Data Exoplanetary Systems Magnetic Field

AI-generated Key Points

  • The article explores the long-term evolution of the solar wind and its observed properties
  • Data from the solar wind 4 billion years ago is inaccessible, so stellar data is used to better understand it in a stellar context
  • Various detection methods are used to study winds of solar-like stars and derive an observed evolutionary sequence of solar wind mass-loss rates
  • Observational properties are linked with stellar wind models
  • Implications of the evolution of the solar wind on Earth and other planets in our solar system are discussed
  • Studying exoplanetary systems could provide new avenues for progress in understanding the evolution of the solar wind
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Authors: A. A. Vidotto

arXiv: 2103.15748v1 - DOI (astro-ph.SR)
Living Reviews in Solar Physics, in press, 26 figures, 88 pages (invited review article)
License: CC BY 4.0

Abstract: How has the solar wind evolved to reach what it is today? In this review, I discuss the long-term evolution of the solar wind, including the evolution of observed properties that are intimately linked to the solar wind: rotation, magnetism and activity. Given that we cannot access data from the solar wind 4 billion years ago, this review relies on stellar data, in an effort to better place the Sun and the solar wind in a stellar context. I overview some clever detection methods of winds of solar-like stars, and derive from these an observed evolutionary sequence of solar wind mass-loss rates. I then link these observational properties (including, rotation, magnetism and activity) with stellar wind models. I conclude this review then by discussing implications of the evolution of the solar wind on the evolving Earth and other solar system planets. I argue that studying exoplanetary systems could open up new avenues for progress to be made in our understanding of the evolution of the solar wind.

Submitted to arXiv on 29 Mar. 2021

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2103.15748v1

In this review article, Aline A. Vidotto explores the long-term evolution of the solar wind and its observed properties that are closely linked to it, such as rotation, magnetism, and activity. Since data from the solar wind 4 billion years ago is inaccessible, Vidotto relies on stellar data to better understand the Sun and its solar wind in a stellar context. The author provides an overview of various detection methods used to study winds of solar-like stars and derives an observed evolutionary sequence of solar wind mass-loss rates from these methods. These observational properties are then linked with stellar wind models. The article concludes by discussing the implications of the evolution of the solar wind on Earth and other planets in our solar system. Vidotto argues that studying exoplanetary systems could provide new avenues for progress in understanding the evolution of the solar wind; this research could help us better understand how planetary atmospheres evolve over time and how they interact with their host star's magnetic field. Overall, this comprehensive review provides valuable insights into our current understanding of how the solar wind has evolved over time and its impact on our planet and beyond.
Created on 05 May. 2023

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