Brownian snails with removal: epidemics in diffusing populations

AI-generated keywords: Epidemics SIR-type models Brownian motion dynamics Critical value Public health policy

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The paper introduces two stochastic models for the spread of infection through a spatially-distributed population
  • Individuals move continuously according to independent diffusion processes, similar to frog models but with the added action of removal and the fact that frogs jump whereas snails slither
  • The disease may pass from an infected individual to an uninfected individual when they are sufficiently close, and infected individuals are permanently removed at a given rate $\alpha$
  • The two models studied in this paper are called the "delayed diffusion" model and the "diffusion" model
  • Conditions are established under which the disease infects only finitely many individuals almost surely using a perturbative argument
  • There exists a critical value $\alpha_c\in(0,\infty)$ for the survival of an epidemic in the delayed diffusion model, which depends on various parameters such as population size and movement rates
  • If $\alpha<\alpha_c$, then there is no epidemic outbreak; otherwise, there is an outbreak with positive probability.
  • This paper provides valuable insights into how epidemics spread through spatially-distributed populations using SIR-type models with Brownian motion dynamics.
  • The results have important implications for public health policy and disease control strategies in real-world scenarios where infections can spread rapidly across large areas due to human mobility patterns.
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Authors: Geoffrey R. Grimmett, Zhongyang Li

v3: Some expansion and fuller proofs. Electronic Journal of Probability, accepted version

Abstract: Two stochastic models of susceptible/infected/removed (SIR) type are introduced for the spread of infection through a spatially-distributed population. Individuals are initially distributed at random in space, and they move continuously according to independent diffusion processes. The disease may pass from an infected individual to an uninfected individual when they are sufficiently close. Infected individuals are permanently removed at some given rate $\alpha$. Such processes are reminiscent of so-called frog models, but differ through the action of removal, as well as the fact that frogs jump whereas snails slither. Two models are studied here, termed the `delayed diffusion' and the `diffusion' models. In the first, individuals are stationary until they are infected, at which time they begin to move; in the second, all individuals start to move at the initial time $0$. Using a perturbative argument, conditions are established under which the disease infects a.s. only finitely many individuals. It is proved for the delayed diffusion model that there exists a critical value $\alpha_c\in(0,\infty)$ for the survival of the epidemic.

Submitted to arXiv on 05 Sep. 2020

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2009.02495v3

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The paper "Brownian snails with removal: epidemics in diffusing populations" by Geoffrey R. Grimmett and Zhongyang Li introduces two stochastic models of susceptible/infected/removed (SIR) type for the spread of infection through a spatially-distributed population. The individuals are initially distributed at random in space and move continuously according to independent diffusion processes, similar to frog models but with the added action of removal and the fact that frogs jump whereas snails slither. The disease may pass from an infected individual to an uninfected individual when they are sufficiently close, and infected individuals are permanently removed at a given rate $\alpha$. The two models studied in this paper are called the "delayed diffusion" model and the "diffusion" model. In the delayed diffusion model, individuals remain stationary until they become infected, after which they begin to move. In contrast, all individuals start moving at time zero in the diffusion model. Using a perturbative argument, conditions are established under which the disease infects only finitely many individuals almost surely. The authors prove that there exists a critical value $\alpha_c\in(0,\infty)$ for the survival of an epidemic in the delayed diffusion model. This critical value depends on various parameters such as population size and movement rates. Additionally, they show that if $\alpha<\alpha_c$, then there is no epidemic outbreak; otherwise, there is an outbreak with positive probability. Overall, this paper provides valuable insights into how epidemics spread through spatially-distributed populations using SIR-type models with Brownian motion dynamics. The results have important implications for public health policy and disease control strategies in real-world scenarios where infections can spread rapidly across large areas due to human mobility patterns.
Created on 17 Apr. 2023

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