A Thirty-Four Billion Solar Mass Black Hole in SMSS J2157-3602, the Most Luminous Known Quasar

AI-generated keywords: Supermassive Black Holes Quasar Galaxy Evolution MgII Emission Line Doublet Eddington Ratio

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  • Astronomers led by Christopher A. Onken estimated the black hole mass of quasar SMSS J215728.21-360215.1 to be (3.4 +/- 0.6) x 10^10 M_sun using near-infrared spectroscopic measurements of the MgII emission line doublet and refined its redshift to z=4.692.
  • This quasar hosts one of the most massive black holes at z > 4 and is considered as the most luminous known quasar with a 3000A luminosity of (4.7 +/- 0.5) x 10^47 erg/s and an estimated bolometric luminosity of 1.6 x 10^48 erg/s.
  • Despite its high luminosity, SMSS J2157's Eddington ratio is only ~0.4, suggesting that its extreme brightness is due to its extremely large BH rather than an unusually high accretion rate onto a smaller BH as seen in other highly luminous quasars.
  • This discovery provides new insights into how supermassive black holes grow in the early Universe and sheds light on their role in shaping galaxy evolution over cosmic time scales.
  • The findings were published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and could help us better understand how galaxies form and evolve over time by providing clues about how these massive objects impact their surroundings through radiation and gravitational forces.
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Authors: Christopher A. Onken (ANU), Fuyan Bian (ESO), Xiaohui Fan (Arizona), Feige Wang (Arizona), Christian Wolf (ANU), Jinyi Yang (Arizona)

arXiv: 2005.06868v2 - DOI (astro-ph.GA)
7 pages, 3 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS

Abstract: From near-infrared spectroscopic measurements of the MgII emission line doublet, we estimate the black hole (BH) mass of the quasar, SMSS J215728.21-360215.1, as being (3.4 +/- 0.6) x 10^10 M_sun and refine the redshift of the quasar to be z=4.692. SMSS J2157 is the most luminous known quasar, with a 3000A luminosity of (4.7 +/- 0.5) x 10^47 erg/s and an estimated bolometric luminosity of 1.6 x 10^48 erg/s, yet its Eddington ratio is only ~0.4. Thus, the high luminosity of this quasar is a consequence of its extremely large BH -- one of the most massive BHs at z > 4.

Submitted to arXiv on 14 May. 2020

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A team of astronomers led by Christopher A. Onken have estimated the black hole (BH) mass of the quasar SMSS J215728.21-360215.1 to be (3.4 +/- 0.6) x 10^10 M_sun using near-infrared spectroscopic measurements of the MgII emission line doublet and refined its redshift to z=4.692. This quasar is now known to host one of the most massive black holes at z > 4 and is considered as the most luminous known quasar with a 3000A luminosity of (4.7 +/- 0.5) x 10^47 erg/s and an estimated bolometric luminosity of 1.6 x 10^48 erg/s. Despite its high luminosity, SMSS J2157's Eddington ratio is only ~0.4, suggesting that its extreme brightness is due to its extremely large BH rather than an unusually high accretion rate onto a smaller BH as seen in other highly luminous quasars. This discovery provides new insights into how supermassive black holes grow in the early Universe and sheds light on their role in shaping galaxy evolution over cosmic time scales. The findings were published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society and could help us better understand how galaxies form and evolve over time by providing clues about how these massive objects impact their surroundings through radiation and gravitational forces.
Created on 13 Jun. 2023

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