Learning To Navigate The Synthetically Accessible Chemical Space Using Reinforcement Learning

AI-generated keywords: Reinforcement Learning De Novo Drug Design Synthetic Accessibility Chemical Space Automating

AI-generated Key Points

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  • Machine learning for de novo drug design has made significant progress in the last decade, particularly in deep generative models.
  • Current generative approaches face a major challenge as they do not ensure that the proposed molecular structures can be feasibly synthesized nor do they provide the synthesis routes of the proposed small molecules, which limits their practical applicability.
  • A team of researchers has proposed a novel forward synthesis framework powered by reinforcement learning (RL) for de novo drug design called Policy Gradient for Forward Synthesis (PGFS).
  • PGFS embeds the concept of synthetic accessibility directly into the de novo drug design system and enables an agent to navigate through synthetically accessible chemical space by subjecting commercially available small molecule building blocks to valid chemical reactions at every time step of the iterative virtual multi-step synthesis process.
  • PGFS achieves state-of-the-art performance in generating structures with high QED and penalized clogP and was validated in an in-silico proof-of-concept associated with three HIV targets.
  • The end-to-end training conceptualized in this study represents an important paradigm shift in radically expanding the synthesizable chemical space and automating the drug discovery process.
  • PGFS offers a promising solution to one of the major challenges facing current generative approaches in de novo drug design. It opens up new possibilities for automating and accelerating drug discovery processes while significantly reducing costs.
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Authors: Sai Krishna Gottipati, Boris Sattarov, Sufeng Niu, Yashaswi Pathak, Haoran Wei, Shengchao Liu, Karam M. J. Thomas, Simon Blackburn, Connor W. Coley, Jian Tang, Sarath Chandar, Yoshua Bengio

added the statistics of top-100 compounds used logP metric with scaled components added values of the initial reactants to the box plots some values in tables are recalculated due to the inconsistent environments on different machines. corresponding benchmarks were rerun with the requirements on github. no significant changes in the results. corrected figures in the Appendix

Abstract: Over the last decade, there has been significant progress in the field of machine learning for de novo drug design, particularly in deep generative models. However, current generative approaches exhibit a significant challenge as they do not ensure that the proposed molecular structures can be feasibly synthesized nor do they provide the synthesis routes of the proposed small molecules, thereby seriously limiting their practical applicability. In this work, we propose a novel forward synthesis framework powered by reinforcement learning (RL) for de novo drug design, Policy Gradient for Forward Synthesis (PGFS), that addresses this challenge by embedding the concept of synthetic accessibility directly into the de novo drug design system. In this setup, the agent learns to navigate through the immense synthetically accessible chemical space by subjecting commercially available small molecule building blocks to valid chemical reactions at every time step of the iterative virtual multi-step synthesis process. The proposed environment for drug discovery provides a highly challenging test-bed for RL algorithms owing to the large state space and high-dimensional continuous action space with hierarchical actions. PGFS achieves state-of-the-art performance in generating structures with high QED and penalized clogP. Moreover, we validate PGFS in an in-silico proof-of-concept associated with three HIV targets. Finally, we describe how the end-to-end training conceptualized in this study represents an important paradigm in radically expanding the synthesizable chemical space and automating the drug discovery process.

Submitted to arXiv on 26 Apr. 2020

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 2004.12485v2

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The field of machine learning for de novo drug design has made significant progress over the last decade, particularly in deep generative models. However, current generative approaches face a major challenge as they do not ensure that the proposed molecular structures can be feasibly synthesized nor do they provide the synthesis routes of the proposed small molecules, which limits their practical applicability. To address this challenge, a team of researchers has proposed a novel forward synthesis framework powered by reinforcement learning (RL) for de novo drug design called Policy Gradient for Forward Synthesis (PGFS). This framework embeds the concept of synthetic accessibility directly into the de novo drug design system. In this setup, an agent learns to navigate through the immense synthetically accessible chemical space by subjecting commercially available small molecule building blocks to valid chemical reactions at every time step of the iterative virtual multi-step synthesis process. The proposed environment for drug discovery provides a highly challenging test-bed for RL algorithms due to its large state space and high-dimensional continuous action space with hierarchical actions. PGFS achieves state-of-the-art performance in generating structures with high QED and penalized clogP. The team validated PGFS in an in-silico proof-of-concept associated with three HIV targets. Furthermore, the end-to-end training conceptualized in this study represents an important paradigm shift in radically expanding the synthesizable chemical space and automating the drug discovery process. The team describes how their approach could significantly reduce costs and accelerate drug development timelines by enabling more efficient exploration of chemical space. Overall, PGFS offers a promising solution to one of the major challenges facing current generative approaches in de novo drug design. By embedding synthetic accessibility into its framework and leveraging reinforcement learning techniques, it opens up new possibilities for automating and accelerating drug discovery processes.
Created on 30 Apr. 2023

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