Disk tearing in a young triple star system with misaligned disk/orbit planes

AI-generated keywords: Disk Tearing Planet Formation Triple System GW Orionis Misaligned Disk

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  • Gravitational influence of stars shapes circumstellar disks in young multiple stellar systems
  • Recent observations of the triple system GW Orionis provide direct evidence for disk tearing
  • Disk tearing is a phenomenon where gravitational torques due to misaligned disk/orbit planes warp the disk and break the inner disk into precessing rings
  • The study imaged an eccentric ring that is misaligned with respect to the orbital planes and outer disk, casting shadows on the strongly warped intermediate disk
  • This finding could have significant implications for our understanding of planetary formation in multiple star systems
  • The authors suggest that this ring might offer suitable conditions for planet formation, providing a mechanism for forming wide-separation planets on highly oblique orbits
  • Additional information:
  • The paper is currently under review at Science and contains 74 pages with 3+19 figures and 6 tables.
  • It was conducted by a team of scientists including Stefan Kraus, Alexander Kreplin, Alison K. Young, Matthew R. Bate, John D. Monnier, Tim J Harries, Henning Avenhaus Jacques Kluska Anna S E Laws Evan A Rich Matthew Willson Alicia N Aarnio Fred C Adams Sean M Andrews Narsireddy Anugu Jaehan Bae Theo ten Brummelaar Nuria Calvet Michel Curé Claire L Davies Jacob Ennis Catherine Espaillat Tyler Gardner Lee Hartmann Sasha Hinkley Aaron Labdon Cyprien Lanthermann Jean-Baptiste LeBouquin Gail H Schaefer Benjamin R Setterholm David Wilner and Zhaohuan Zhu.
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Authors: Stefan Kraus, Alexander Kreplin, Alison K. Young, Matthew R. Bate, John D. Monnier, Tim J. Harries, Henning Avenhaus, Jacques Kluska, Anna S. E. Laws, Evan A. Rich, Matthew Willson, Alicia N. Aarnio, Fred C. Adams, Sean M. Andrews, Narsireddy Anugu, Jaehan Bae, Theo ten Brummelaar, Nuria Calvet, Michel Curé, Claire L. Davies, Jacob Ennis, Catherine Espaillat, Tyler Gardner, Lee Hartmann, Sasha Hinkley, Aaron Labdon, Cyprien Lanthermann, Jean-Baptiste LeBouquin, Gail H. Schaefer, Benjamin R. Setterholm, David Wilner, Zhaohuan Zhu

arXiv: 2004.01204v1 - DOI (astro-ph.SR)
74 pages, 3+19 Figures, 6 Tables, paper under review at 'Science' (version prior to peer review)

Abstract: In young multiple stellar systems the gravitational influence of the stars shapes the circumstellar disk, controlling accretion and the material available for planet formation. Our observations of the triple system GW Orionis provide direct evidence for disk tearing, where the gravitational torques due to misaligned disk/orbit planes warp the disk and break the inner disk into precessing rings. We image an eccentric ring that is misaligned with respect to the orbital planes and outer disk, and casts shadows on the strongly warped intermediate disk. Our ring/warp geometry constraints and the fully characterized perturber orbits make the system a potential Rosetta Stone for studying disk hydrodynamics. The ring might offer suitable conditions for planet formation, providing a mechanism for forming wide-separation planets on highly oblique orbits.

Submitted to arXiv on 02 Apr. 2020

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In young multiple stellar systems, the gravitational influence of stars shapes circumstellar disks, controlling accretion and the material available for planet formation. Recent observations of the triple system GW Orionis provide direct evidence for disk tearing – a phenomenon where gravitational torques due to misaligned disk/orbit planes warp the disk and break the inner disk into precessing rings. The study imaged an eccentric ring that is misaligned with respect to the orbital planes and outer disk, casting shadows on the strongly warped intermediate disk. The ring/warp geometry constraints and fully characterized perturber orbits make this system a potential Rosetta Stone for studying disk hydrodynamics. This finding could have significant implications for our understanding of planetary formation in multiple star systems. The authors suggest that this ring might offer suitable conditions for planet formation, providing a mechanism for forming wide-separation planets on highly oblique orbits. This paper is currently under review at Science and contains 74 pages with 3+19 figures and 6 tables. It was conducted by a team of scientists including Stefan Kraus, Alexander Kreplin, Alison K. Young, Matthew R. Bate, John D. Monnier, Tim J Harries, Henning Avenhaus Jacques Kluska Anna S E Laws Evan A Rich Matthew Willson Alicia N Aarnio Fred C Adams Sean M Andrews Narsireddy Anugu Jaehan Bae Theo ten Brummelaar Nuria Calvet Michel Curé Claire L Davies Jacob Ennis Catherine Espaillat Tyler Gardner Lee Hartmann Sasha Hinkley Aaron Labdon Cyprien Lanthermann Jean-Baptiste LeBouquin Gail H Schaefer Benjamin R Setterholm David Wilner and Zhaohuan Zhu.
Created on 29 Mar. 2023

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