The high-energy environment and atmospheric escape of the mini-Neptune K2-18 b

AI-generated keywords: K2-18 b Lyman-alpha STIS EUV irradiation escape rate

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • K2-18 b is a mini-Neptune exoplanet that orbits a nearby cool M3 dwarf star
  • Researchers used Lyman-alpha transit spectroscopy with the STIS instrument on the HST to search for hydrogen escape from K2-18 b's atmosphere
  • During one partial transit, the average blueshifted emission decreased by 67% ± 18%, tentatively indicating vigorous hydrogen atom escape being blown away by radiation pressure
  • Reconstructed Lyman-alpha emission data estimated an EUV irradiation between $10^1$-$10^2$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a total escape rate around $10^8$ g s$^{-1}$
  • K2-18 b will lose only a small fraction (<1%) of its mass and retain its volatile-rich atmosphere during its lifetime
  • Further observations are necessary to confirm in-transit absorption and gain a more comprehensive understanding of K2-18 b's high energy environment
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Authors: Leonardo A. dos Santos, David Ehrenreich, Vincent Bourrier, Nicola Astudillo-Defru, Xavier Bonfils, François Forget, Christophe Lovis, Francesco Pepe, Stéphane Udry

arXiv: 2001.04532v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
5 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in A&A Letters

Abstract: K2-18 b is a transiting mini-Neptune that orbits a nearby (38 pc) cool M3 dwarf and is located inside its region of temperate irradiation. We report on the search for hydrogen escape from the atmosphere K2-18 b using Lyman-$\alpha$ transit spectroscopy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyzed the time-series of the fluxes of the stellar Lyman-$\alpha$ emission of K2-18 in both its blue- and redshifted wings. We found that the average blueshifted emission of K2-18 decreases by $67\% \pm 18\%$ during the transit of the planet compared to the pre-transit emission, tentatively indicating the presence of H atoms escaping vigorously and being blown away by radiation pressure. This interpretation is not definitive because it relies on one partial transit. Based on the reconstructed Lyman-$\alpha$ emission of K2-18, we estimate an EUV irradiation between $10^1-10^2$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a total escape rate in the order of $10^8$ g s$^{-1}$. The inferred escape rate suggests that the planet will lose only a small fraction (< 1%) of its mass and retain its volatile-rich atmosphere during its lifetime. More observations are needed to rule out stellar variability effects, confirm the in-transit absorption and better assess the atmospheric escape and high-energy environment of K2-18 b.

Submitted to arXiv on 13 Jan. 2020

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This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

K2-18 b is a mini-Neptune exoplanet that orbits a nearby cool M3 dwarf star located within its region of temperate irradiation. Researchers used Lyman-alpha transit spectroscopy with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to search for hydrogen escape from K2-18 b's atmosphere. Analysis of the time-series of fluxes revealed that during one partial transit, the average blueshifted emission decreased by 67% ± 18%, tentatively indicating vigorous hydrogen atom escape being blown away by radiation pressure. Reconstructed Lyman-alpha emission data estimated an EUV irradiation between $10^1$-$10^2$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ and a total escape rate around $10^8$ g s$^{-1}$. This suggests that K2-18 b will lose only a small fraction (<1%) of its mass and retain its volatile-rich atmosphere during its lifetime. Further observations are necessary to confirm in-transit absorption and gain a more comprehensive understanding of K2-18 b's high energy environment.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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