Revised description of dust diffusion and a new instability creating multiple rings in protoplanetary disks

AI-generated keywords: Protoplanetary disks Instabilities Dust Diffusion Angular Momentum Planet Formation

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Protoplanetary disks contain instabilities that can lead to the formation of multiple-ring structures and planetesimals
  • Turbulent diffusion of dust grains hinders these instabilities and dust accumulation in a turbulent gaseous disk
  • Equations were formulated to describe dust diffusion while conserving total angular momentum in a disk
  • Linear perturbation analysis on secular gravitational instability (GI) using these equations found it to be a monotonically growing mode, contrary to previous analyses that found it overstable
  • A new axisymmetric instability called two-component viscous gravitational instability (TVGI) was discovered, caused by the combination of dust-gas friction and turbulent gas viscosity, which efficiently accumulates dust grains and is promising for forming multiple-ring-like structures and planetesimals
  • TVGI's most unstable wavelength is comparable to or smaller than the gas scale height
  • Both secular GI and TVGI were found capable of creating multiple rings with widths around 10 au at orbital radii larger than 50 au in HL Tau disk
  • This refined understanding of dust diffusion and instabilities in protoplanetary disks could provide insights into how planets form around young stars.
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Authors: Ryosuke T. Tominaga, Sanemichi Z. Takahashi, Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

arXiv: 1905.12899v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
20 pages, 14 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ

Abstract: Various instabilities have been proposed as a promising mechanism to accumulate dust. Moreover, some of them are expected to lead to the multiple-ring structure formation and the planetesimal formation in protoplanetary disks. In a turbulent gaseous disk, the growth of the instabilities and the dust accumulation are quenched by turbulent diffusion of dust grains. The diffusion process has been often modeled by a diffusion term in the continuity equation for the dust density. The dust diffusion model, however, does not guarantee the angular momentum conservation in a disk. In this study, we first formulate equations that describe the dust diffusion and also conserve the total angular momentum of a disk. Second, we perform the linear perturbation analysis on the secular gravitational instability (GI) using the equations. The results show that the secular GI is a monotonically growing mode, contrary to the result of previous analyses that found it overstable. We find that the overstability is caused by the non-conservation of the angular momentum. Third, we find a new axisymmetric instability due to the combination of the dust-gas friction and the turbulent gas viscosity, which we refer to as two-component viscous gravitational instability (TVGI). The most unstable wavelength of TVGI is comparable to or smaller than the gas scale height. TVGI accumulates dust grains efficiently, which indicates that TVGI is a promising mechanism for the formation of multiple-ring-like structures and planetesimals. Finally, we examine the validity of the ring formation via the secular GI and TVGI in the HL Tau disk and find both instabilities can create multiple rings whose width is about 10 au at orbital radii larger than 50 au.

Submitted to arXiv on 30 May. 2019

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1905.12899v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

Protoplanetary disks are known to contain various instabilities that can accumulate dust and lead to the formation of multiple-ring structures and planetesimals. However, in a turbulent gaseous disk, these instabilities and dust accumulation are hindered by the turbulent diffusion of dust grains. To model this diffusion process, a diffusion term is often added to the continuity equation for the dust density. In a recent study led by Ryosuke T. Tominaga from Kyoto University, equations were formulated that describe dust diffusion while conserving total angular momentum in a disk. The team then performed linear perturbation analysis on secular gravitational instability (GI) using these equations and found that it is a monotonically growing mode, contrary to previous analyses that found it overstable. The overstability was attributed to non-conservation of angular momentum. The team also discovered a new axisymmetric instability called two-component viscous gravitational instability (TVGI), caused by the combination of dust-gas friction and turbulent gas viscosity. TVGI accumulates dust grains efficiently, making it a promising mechanism for forming multiple-ring-like structures and planetesimals. The most unstable wavelength of TVGI is comparable to or smaller than the gas scale height. Finally, the validity of ring formation via secular GI and TVGI was examined in HL Tau disk. Both instabilities were found capable of creating multiple rings with widths around 10 au at orbital radii larger than 50 au. This refined understanding of dust diffusion and instabilities in protoplanetary disks could provide insights into how planets form around young stars.
Created on 26 Apr. 2023

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