Hot exozodiacal dust: an exocometary origin?

AI-generated keywords: Exozodiacal dust Poynting-Robertson drag Exocometary dust delivery Numerical model Radiative transfer

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The study investigates two mechanisms for the production of exozodiacal dust: Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario and exocometary dust delivery scenario.
  • A new numerical model was developed to calculate dust dynamics, including non-orbit-averaged equations for grains close to the star, dust sublimation, and a radiative transfer code for direct comparison with observations.
  • Four stellar types and three dust compositions were considered, assuming a parent belt at 50 au.
  • The Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario cannot produce long-lived submicron-sized grains close to the star. Inward drifting grains fill in the region between the parent belt and sublimation distance, producing an unrealistically strong mid-infrared excess compared to near-infrared excess.
  • Exocometary dust delivery scenario can form a narrow ring close to the sublimation zone populated with large grains several tens to several hundred micrometers in radius. This scenario provides a better match with observations if carbon-rich grains are present.
  • The required number of active exocomets needed to sustain observed dust level is reasonable.
  • Hot exozodiacal dust detected by near-infrared interferometry is unlikely due to inward grain migration by Poynting-Robertson drag from distant parent belt but could instead have an exocometary origin.
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Authors: Élie Sezestre, Jean-Charles Augereau, Philippe Thébault

A&A 626, A2 (2019)
arXiv: 1903.06130v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
21 pages, 17 figures, abstract abridged, accepted for publication in A&A

Abstract: We aim to explore two exozodiacal dust production mechanisms, first re-investigating the Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario, and then elaborating on the less explored, but promising exocometary dust delivery scenario. We developped a new versatile, numerical model that calculates the dust dynamics, with non orbit-averaged equations for the grains close to the star. The model includes dust sublimation and incorporates a radiative transfer code for direct comparison to the observations. We consider in this study four stellar types, three dust compositions, and we assume a parent belt at 50 au. We find that, in the case of the Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario, it is impossible to produce long-lived submicron-sized grains close to the star. The inward drifting grains fill in the region between the parent belt and the sublimation distance, producing an unrealistically strong mid-infrared excess compared to the near-infrared excess. The dust pile-up at the sublimation radius is by far insufficient to boost the near-IR flux of the exozodi to the point where it dominates over the mid-infrared excess. In the case of the exocometary dust delivery scenario, we find that a narrow ring can form close to the sublimation zone, populated with large grains several tens to several hundred of micrometers in radius. Although not perfect, this scenario provides a better match to the observations, especially if the grains are carbon-rich. We also find that the required number of active exocomets to sustain the observed dust level is reasonable. We conclude that the hot exozodiacal dust detected by near-infrared interferometry is unlikely to result from inwards grains migration by Poynting-Robertson drag from a distant parent belt, but could instead have an exocometary origin. [Abridged]

Submitted to arXiv on 14 Mar. 2019

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1903.06130v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The study aims to investigate two mechanisms for the production of exozodiacal dust: the Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario and the exocometary dust delivery scenario. The authors developed a new numerical model that calculates dust dynamics, including non-orbit-averaged equations for grains close to the star, dust sublimation, and a radiative transfer code for direct comparison with observations. They considered four stellar types, three dust compositions, and assumed a parent belt at 50 au. The results show that it is impossible to produce long-lived submicron-sized grains close to the star in the Poynting-Robertson drag pile-up scenario. Inward drifting grains fill in the region between the parent belt and sublimation distance, producing an unrealistically strong mid-infrared excess compared to near-infrared excess. The dust pile-up at the sublimation radius is insufficient to boost near-IR flux of exozodi enough to dominate over mid-infrared excess. However, in the case of exocometary dust delivery scenario, a narrow ring can form close to sublimation zone populated with large grains several tens to several hundred micrometers in radius. Although not perfect, this scenario provides a better match with observations if carbon-rich grains are present. The required number of active exocomets needed to sustain observed dust level is reasonable. Therefore, hot exozodiacal dust detected by near-infrared interferometry is unlikely due to inward grain migration by Poynting-Robertson drag from distant parent belt but could instead have an exocometary origin.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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