Economic geography and the scaling of urban and regional income in India

AI-generated keywords: Urban Agglomerations Economic Geography Scaling Analysis GDP India

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The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The paper titled "Economic geography and the scaling of urban and regional income in India" explores the relationship between economic income (Gross Domestic Product, GDP) and population size in Indian districts and cities.
  • Scaling analysis is used to identify network effects in socioeconomic organization.
  • Almost linear scaling of GDP with population for districts is found, which is different from urban functional units in other national contexts.
  • Strong distinct geographic patterns of economic behavior are discovered that are connected to the literature on regional economic development for a diverse subcontinental nation like India.
  • A new dataset of GDP based on districts for large cities using a set of assumptions reveals superlinear scaling of income with city size, as expected from theory while displaying similar underlying patterns of economic geography observed for district economic performance.
  • The analysis is limited by the absence of higher-fidelity direct city-level economic data.
  • The authors discuss the need for standardized and consistent estimates of the size and change in urban economies in India while pointing out several proxies that can be explored to develop such indicators.
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Authors: Anand Sahasranaman, Luis M. A. Bettencourt

arXiv: 1902.09872v1 - DOI (physics.soc-ph)
16 pages, 9 figures

Abstract: We undertake an exploration of the economic income (Gross Domestic Product, GDP) of Indian districts and cities based on scaling analyses of the dependence of these quantities on associated population size. Scaling analysis provides a straightforward method for the identification of network effects in socioeconomic organization, which are the tell-tale of cities and urbanization. For districts, a sub-state regional administrative division in India, we find almost linear scaling of GDP with population, a result quite different from urban functional units in other national contexts. Using deviations from scaling, we explore the behavior of these regional units to find strong distinct geographic patterns of economic behavior. We characterize these patterns in detail and connect them to the literature on regional economic development for a diverse subcontinental nation such as India. Given the paucity of economic data for Urban Agglomerations in India, we use a set of assumptions to create a new dataset of GDP based on districts, for large cities. This reveals superlinear scaling of income with city size, as expected from theory, while displaying similar underlying patterns of economic geography observed for district economic performance. This analysis of the economic performance of Indian cities is severely limited by the absence of higher-fidelity, direct city level economic data. We discuss the need for standardized and consistent estimates of the size and change in urban economies in India, and point to a number of proxies that can be explored to develop such indicators.

Submitted to arXiv on 26 Feb. 2019

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In their paper titled "Economic geography and the scaling of urban and regional income in India," Anand Sahasranaman and Luis M. A. Bettencourt explore the relationship between economic income (Gross Domestic Product, GDP) and population size in Indian districts and cities. Using scaling analysis as a method to identify network effects in socioeconomic organization, the authors find almost linear scaling of GDP with population for districts, which is different from urban functional units in other national contexts. The authors also use deviations from scaling to examine the behavior of these regional units and discover strong distinct geographic patterns of economic behavior that they connect to the literature on regional economic development for a diverse subcontinental nation like India. Due to the lack of economic data for Urban Agglomerations in India, the authors create a new dataset of GDP based on districts for large cities using a set of assumptions. This reveals superlinear scaling of income with city size, as expected from theory while displaying similar underlying patterns of economic geography observed for district economic performance. However, this analysis is severely limited by the absence of higher-fidelity direct city-level economic data. The authors discuss the need for standardized and consistent estimates of the size and change in urban economies in India while pointing out several proxies that can be explored to develop such indicators. Overall, this study provides valuable insights into understanding how socioeconomic organization affects cities' growth patterns and highlights areas where more research is needed to improve our understanding further.
Created on 30 Apr. 2023

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