How does stock market volatility react to oil shocks?

AI-generated keywords: Oil Price Shocks Stock Market Volatility Structural Vector Autoregressive Model Aggregate Demand Oil-Specific Demand

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The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Andrea Bastianin and Matteo Manera study the impact of oil price shocks on the U.S. stock market volatility.
  • They use a structural vector autoregressive model to jointly analyze three different structural oil market shocks - aggregate demand, oil supply, and oil-specific demand shocks - and stock market volatility.
  • To achieve identification, they assume that the price of crude oil reacts to stock market volatility only with delay.
  • The authors find that volatility responds significantly to unexpected changes in aggregate and oil-specific demand-driven oil price shocks, while the impact of supply-side shocks is negligible.
  • Their findings provide important insights for investors and policymakers who need to understand how changes in oil prices affect stock markets' stability.
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Authors: Andrea Bastianin, Matteo Manera

Abstract: We study the impact of oil price shocks on the U.S. stock market volatility. We jointly analyze three different structural oil market shocks (i.e., aggregate demand, oil supply, and oil-specific demand shocks) and stock market volatility using a structural vector autoregressive model. Identification is achieved by assuming that the price of crude oil reacts to stock market volatility only with delay. This implies that innovations to the price of crude oil are not strictly exogenous, but predetermined with respect to the stock market. We show that volatility responds significantly to oil price shocks caused by unexpected changes in aggregate and oil-specific demand, whereas the impact of supply-side shocks is negligible.

Submitted to arXiv on 09 Nov. 2018

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1811.03820v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In their study, Andrea Bastianin and Matteo Manera investigate the impact of oil price shocks on the U.S. stock market volatility. They use a structural vector autoregressive model to jointly analyze three different structural oil market shocks - aggregate demand, oil supply, and oil-specific demand shocks - and stock market volatility. To achieve identification, they assume that the price of crude oil reacts to stock market volatility only with delay. This implies that innovations to the price of crude oil are not strictly exogenous but predetermined with respect to the stock market. The authors find that volatility responds significantly to unexpected changes in aggregate and oil-specific demand-driven oil price shocks, while the impact of supply-side shocks is negligible. Their findings provide important insights for investors and policymakers who need to understand how changes in oil prices affect stock markets' stability.
Created on 14 Jun. 2023

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