A Population of Bona Fide Intermediate Mass Black Holes Identified as Low Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

AI-generated keywords: Intermediate Mass Black Holes Formation Mechanisms Supermassive Black Holes Active Galactic Nuclei Data Mining

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The study focuses on identifying intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in galactic nuclei
  • IMBHs are believed to be the missing link between smaller black holes and supermassive black holes
  • Supermassive black holes exist in nearly every massive galaxy and correlate with properties of their host galaxies
  • Two proposed channels for their formation include direct collapse of gas clouds or from smaller black holes formed by first stars
  • Using data mining, this study identified a sample of 305 IMBH candidates with masses ranging from $3\times10^4$ to $2\times10^5 M_{\odot}$ that reside in galaxy centers and exhibit characteristic signatures of type-I active galactic nuclei (AGN)
  • Ten sources were confirmed as AGNs, including five previously known objects that validated the method used
  • All IMBH host galaxies possess small bulges and sit on the low-mass extension of the $M_{\mathrm{BH}}-M_{\mathrm{bulge}}$ scaling relation, suggesting that they have experienced very few major mergers over their lifetime
  • This supports the stellar mass seed scenario for massive black hole formation from smaller black holes formed by first stars rather than direct collapse of gas clouds.
  • Overall, this study provides important insights into the formation mechanisms for supermassive black holes and sheds light on an elusive population of intermediate mass black holes.
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Authors: Igor V. Chilingarian, Ivan Yu. Katkov, Ivan Yu. Zolotukhin, Kirill A. Grishin, Yuri Beletsky, Konstantina Boutsia, David J. Osip

arXiv: 1805.01467v1 - DOI (astro-ph.GA)
18 pages, 8 figures, 3 tables (table 3 is available for download as ancillary file); submitted to ApJ

Abstract: Nearly every massive galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole (SMBH) in its nucleus. SMBH masses are millions to billions $M_{\odot}$, and they correlate with properties of spheroids of their host galaxies. While the SMBH growth channels, mergers and gas accretion, are well established, their origin remains uncertain: they could have either emerged from massive "seeds" ($10^5-10^6 M_{\odot}$) formed by direct collapse of gas clouds in the early Universe or from smaller ($100 M_{\odot}$) black holes, end-products of first stars. The latter channel would leave behind numerous intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs, $10^2-10^5 M_{\odot}$). Although many IMBH candidates have been identified, none is accepted as definitive, thus their very existence is still debated. Using data mining in wide-field sky surveys and applying dedicated analysis to archival and follow-up optical spectra, we identified a sample of 305 IMBH candidates having masses $3\times10^4<M_{\mathrm{BH}}<2\times10^5 M_{\odot}$, which reside in galaxy centers and are accreting gas that creates characteristic signatures of a type-I active galactic nucleus (AGN). We confirmed the AGN nature of ten sources (including five previously known objects which validate our method) by detecting the X-ray emission from their accretion discs, thus defining the first bona fide sample of IMBHs in galactic nuclei. All IMBH host galaxies possess small bulges and sit on the low-mass extension of the $M_{\mathrm{BH}}-M_{\mathrm{bulge}}$ scaling relation suggesting that they must have experienced very few if any major mergers over their lifetime. The very existence of nuclear IMBHs supports the stellar mass seed scenario of the massive black hole formation.

Submitted to arXiv on 03 May. 2018

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1805.01467v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

This study focuses on the identification of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in galactic nuclei, which are believed to be the missing link between smaller black holes and supermassive black holes. While the origin of supermassive black holes is still uncertain, they are known to exist in nearly every massive galaxy and correlate with properties of their host galaxies. The two proposed channels for their formation include direct collapse of gas clouds in the early universe or from smaller black holes formed by first stars. The latter channel would leave behind numerous IMBHs, but their existence has been debated due to a lack of definitive candidates. Using data mining in wide-field sky surveys and analyzing archival and follow-up optical spectra, this study identified a sample of 305 IMBH candidates with masses ranging from $3\times10^4$ to $2\times10^5 M_{\odot}$ that reside in galaxy centers and exhibit characteristic signatures of type-I active galactic nuclei (AGN). Ten sources were confirmed as AGNs, including five previously known objects that validated the method used. This confirms the existence of IMBHs in galactic nuclei and defines the first bona fide sample. All IMBH host galaxies possess small bulges and sit on the low-mass extension of the $M_{\mathrm{BH}}-M_{\mathrm{bulge}}$ scaling relation, suggesting that they have experienced very few major mergers over their lifetime. This supports the stellar mass seed scenario for massive black hole formation from smaller black holes formed by first stars rather than direct collapse of gas clouds. Overall, this study provides important insights into the formation mechanisms for supermassive black holes and sheds light on an elusive population of intermediate mass black holes.
Created on 06 Apr. 2023

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