Medical Theses and Derivative Articles: Dissemination Of Contents and Publication Patterns

AI-generated keywords: Derivative Articles Text Analysis Thesis Authors IMRaD Publication Patterns

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • The study investigates dissemination of contents and publication patterns resulting from doctoral theses in universities
  • Focuses on derivative articles that are published as a result of theses but have received little attention in previous studies
  • Authors aim to identify how derivative articles can be recognized through text analysis based on the full-text of medical theses and articles that share authorship
  • Methodology involves exploiting full-text articles according to organization of scientific discourse (IMRaD) using TurnItIn plagiarism tool
  • Discussion section's text similarity rate can differentiate between derivative and non-derivative articles
  • 85% of derivative articles had their thesis author listed first, while supervisors participated as co-authors in 100% of such articles
  • 42% of authorship credit was retained by thesis authors in derivative articles compared to an average of 6.4 co-authors for non-derivative ones
  • 87.5% of derivative articles were published before or in the same year as their respective thesis completion date
  • Doctoral students' publications are often derived from their dissertations, with supervisors playing a significant role in co-authoring these derivatives.
  • Study sheds light on an important aspect of academic publishing within universities and highlights how derivative articles can be identified through text analysis methods.
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Authors: Mercedes Echeverria, David Stuart, Tobias Blanke

Scientometrics (2015) 102: 559

Abstract: Doctoral theses are an important source of publication in universities, although little research has been carried out on the publications resulting from theses, on so-called derivative articles. This study investigates how derivative articles can be identified through a text analysis based on the full-text of a set of medical theses and the full-text of articles, with which they shared authorship. The text similarity analysis methodology applied consisted in exploiting the full-text articles according to organization of scientific discourse (IMRaD) using the TurnItIn plagiarism tool. The study found that the text similarity rate in the Discussion section can be used to discriminate derivative articles from non-derivative articles. Additional findings were: the first position of the thesis's author dominated in 85% of derivative articles, the participation of supervisors as coauthors occurred in 100% of derivative articles, the authorship credit retained by the thesis's author was 42% in derivative articles, the number of coauthors by article was 5 in derivative articles versus 6.4 coauthors, as average, in non-derivative articles and the time differential regarding the year of thesis completion showed that 87.5% of derivative articles were published before or in the same year of thesis completion.

Submitted to arXiv on 14 Jul. 2017

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1707.04439v1

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The study titled "Medical Theses and Derivative Articles: Dissemination Of Contents and Publication Patterns" conducted by Mercedes Echeverria, David Stuart, and Tobias Blanke investigates the dissemination of contents and publication patterns resulting from doctoral theses in universities. The research focuses on derivative articles that are published as a result of theses but have received little attention in previous studies. The authors aim to identify how derivative articles can be recognized through text analysis based on the full-text of medical theses and articles that share authorship. The methodology applied in this study involves exploiting the full-text articles according to organization of scientific discourse (IMRaD) using TurnItIn plagiarism tool. The findings reveal that the Discussion section's text similarity rate can differentiate between derivative and non-derivative articles. Additionally, it was found that 85% of derivative articles had their thesis author listed first, while supervisors participated as co-authors in 100% of such articles. Furthermore, 42% of authorship credit was retained by thesis authors in derivative articles compared to an average of 6.4 co-authors for non-derivative ones. The time differential regarding the year of thesis completion showed that 87.5% of derivative articles were published before or in the same year as their respective thesis completion date. These results suggest that doctoral students' publications are often derived from their dissertations, with supervisors playing a significant role in co-authoring these derivatives. Overall, this study sheds light on an important aspect of academic publishing within universities and highlights how derivative articles can be identified through text analysis methods. It provides valuable insights into publication patterns resulting from doctoral dissertations and emphasizes the significance of supervisor involvement in co-authoring derivatives.
Created on 02 May. 2023

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