The sensitivity of a radical pair compass magnetoreceptor can be significantly amplified by radical scavengers

AI-generated keywords: Magnetic field Cryptochrome proteins Spin dynamics Radical pair Tryptophan

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Researchers proposed a new version of the current model for how birds obtain navigational information from the Earth's magnetic field.
  • The primary detection mechanism of this compass sense involves the quantum spin dynamics of radical pairs formed transiently in cryptochrome proteins.
  • The new model suggests that spin-selective recombination of the radical pair is not essential, and instead one of the two radicals reacts with a paramagnetic scavenger via spin-selective electron transfer.
  • Through simulations, they showed that this new scheme offers greatly enhanced sensitivity to a 50 μT magnetic field and allows animal cryptochromes with a tetrad (rather than a triad) of tryptophan electron donors to still act as viable magnetic compass sensors.
  • Lifting the restriction on the rate of spin-selective recombination reaction allows detrimental effects such as inter-radical exchange and dipolar interactions to be minimized by placing the radicals much further apart than in the current model.
  • These findings hope to gain further insight into how birds navigate using their remarkable ability to detect magnetic fields.
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Authors: Daniel R. Kattnig, P. J. Hore

Scientific Reports 7, Article number: 11640 (2017)
arXiv: 1706.04564v3 - DOI (physics.bio-ph)
24 pages, 12 figures, including supporting information

Abstract: Birds have a remarkable ability to obtain navigational information from the Earth's magnetic field. The primary detection mechanism of this compass sense is uncertain but appears to involve the quantum spin dynamics of radical pairs formed transiently in cryptochrome proteins. We propose here a new version of the current model in which spin-selective recombination of the radical pair is not essential. One of the two radicals is imagined to react with a paramagnetic scavenger via spin-selective electron transfer. By means of simulations of the spin dynamics of cryptochrome-inspired radical pairs, we show that the new scheme offers two clear and important benefits. The sensitivity to a 50 {\mu}T magnetic field is greatly enhanced and, unlike the current model, the radicals can be more than 2 nm apart in the magnetoreceptor protein. The latter means that animal cryptochromes that have a tetrad (rather than a triad) of tryptophan electron donors can still be expected to be viable as magnetic compass sensors. Lifting the restriction on the rate of the spin-selective recombination reaction also means that the detrimental effects of inter-radical exchange and dipolar interactions can be minimised by placing the radicals much further apart than in the current model.

Submitted to arXiv on 14 Jun. 2017

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1706.04564v3

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In a recent study, researchers Daniel R. Kattnig and P.J. Hore proposed a new version of the current model for how birds obtain navigational information from the Earth's magnetic field. The primary detection mechanism of this compass sense is uncertain but appears to involve the quantum spin dynamics of radical pairs formed transiently in cryptochrome proteins. The new model suggests that spin-selective recombination of the radical pair is not essential, and instead one of the two radicals reacts with a paramagnetic scavenger via spin-selective electron transfer. Through simulations of the spin dynamics of cryptochrome-inspired radical pairs, they showed that this new scheme offers two clear and important benefits: greatly enhanced sensitivity to a 50 μT magnetic field, and unlike the current model, the radicals can be more than 2 nm apart in the magnetoreceptor protein. This means that animal cryptochromes with a tetrad (rather than a triad) of tryptophan electron donors can still be expected to act as viable magnetic compass sensors. Additionally, lifting the restriction on the rate of spin-selective recombination reaction allows detrimental effects such as inter-radical exchange and dipolar interactions to be minimized by placing the radicals much further apart than in the current model. With these findings, researchers hope to gain further insight into how birds navigate using their remarkable ability to detect magnetic fields.
Created on 28 Apr. 2023

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