Decomposition Process of Carboxylate MOF HKUST-1 Unveiled at the Atomic Scale Level

AI-generated keywords: Metal-Organic Framework HKUST-1 Hydrolysis Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Scanning Electron Microscopy

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The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • HKUST-1 is a metal-organic framework (MOF) with exceptional adsorption and catalytic properties.
  • The paddle-wheel unit, which is the heart of the material, is prone to hydrolysis when exposed to moisture.
  • An innovative approach combining electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with other techniques was used to investigate this process at an atomic scale level.
  • Three stages of decomposition were identified and corresponding equilibrium structures of the paddle-wheels were uncovered.
  • This study sheds light on how HKUST-1 behaves under different environmental conditions and provides valuable information for future research on MOFs.
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Authors: Michela Todaro, Gianpiero Buscarino, Luisa Sciortino, Antonino Alessi, Fabrizio Messina, Marco Taddei, Marco Ranocchiari, Marco Cannas, Franco M. Gelardi

J. Phys. Chem. C, 2016
arXiv: 1704.01008v1 - DOI (cond-mat.mtrl-sci)
37 pages, 11 figures

Abstract: HKUST-1 is a metal-organic framework (MOF) which plays a significant role both in applicative and basic fields of research, thanks to its outstanding properties of adsorption and catalysis but also because it is a reference material for the study of many general properties of MOFs. Its metallic group comprises a pair of Cu2+ ions chelated by four carboxylate bridges, forming a structure known as paddle-wheel unit, which is the heart of the material. However, previous studies have well established that the paddle-wheel is incline to hydrolysis. In fact, the prolonged exposure of the material to moisture promotes the hydrolysis of Cu-O bonds in the paddle-wheels, so breaking the crystalline network. The main objective of the present experimental investigation is the determination of the details of the structural defects induced by this process in the crystal and it has been successfully pursued by coupling the electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with other more commonly considered techniques, as X-ray diffraction, surface area estimation and scanning electron microscopy. Thanks to this original approach we have recognized three stages of the process of decomposition of HKUST-1 and we have unveiled the details of the corresponding equilibrium structures of the paddle-wheels at the atomic scale level.

Submitted to arXiv on 31 Mar. 2017

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1704.01008v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

HKUST-1 is a highly versatile metal-organic framework (MOF) that has garnered considerable attention in both basic and applied research due to its exceptional adsorption and catalytic properties. However, previous studies have demonstrated that the paddle-wheel unit - which comprises a pair of Cu2+ ions chelated by four carboxylate bridges and is the heart of the material - is prone to hydrolysis. Prolonged exposure to moisture can promote the hydrolysis of Cu-O bonds in the paddle-wheels, resulting in the breakdown of the crystalline network. To investigate this process at an atomic scale level, an innovative approach combining electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with other commonly used techniques such as X-ray diffraction, surface area estimation, and scanning electron microscopy was employed. The main objective was to determine details about the decomposition process of HKUST-1 and uncover corresponding equilibrium structures of the paddle-wheels. This investigation successfully identified three stages of decomposition and provided insights into how these defects manifest at an atomic scale level. Overall, this study sheds light on how HKUST-1 behaves under different environmental conditions and provides valuable information for future research on MOFs.
Created on 20 Apr. 2023

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