Reassessment of the Null Result of the HST Search for Planets in 47 Tucanae

AI-generated keywords: Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae Hubble Space Telescope Planet Populations Field Stars

AI-generated Key Points

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  • A recent study by Kento Masuda and Joshua N. Winn revisited the null result of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) search for transiting planets in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae.
  • The original study by Gilliland and co-workers expected to find 17 planets assuming that stars in 47 Tuc had close-in giant planets with similar characteristics and occurrence rates as those of nearby stars surveyed up until 1999.
  • The new study assumes that 47 Tuc and Kepler stars have identical planet populations, resulting in a revised number of expected detections of $4.0^{+1.7}_{-1.4}$.
  • When restricting the Kepler stars to the same mass range as those searched in 47 Tuc, the number of expected detections is reduced to $2.2^{+1.6}_{-1.1}$.
  • The null result of the HST search is less statistically significant than originally thought; even extreme hypotheses such as 47 Tuc and Kepler stars having identical planet populations cannot be rejected with more than 2-3$\sigma$ significance.
  • This finding highlights the need for more sensitive searches to allow comparisons between planet populations in globular clusters and field stars.
  • Overall, this study provides valuable insights into our understanding of planetary systems within globular clusters and their similarities or differences compared to those found around field stars.
  • It emphasizes how important it is to conduct further research using more advanced techniques so we can better compare planet populations between globular clusters and field stars.
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Authors: Kento Masuda, Joshua N. Winn

arXiv: 1703.06136v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
10 pages, 4 figures, AJ accepted

Abstract: We revisit the null result of the Hubble Space Telescope search for transiting planets in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, in the light of improved knowledge of planet occurrence from the Kepler mission. Gilliland and co-workers expected to find 17 planets, assuming the 47 Tuc stars have close-in giant planets with the same characteristics and occurrence rate as those of the nearby stars that had been surveyed up until 1999. We update this result by assuming that 47 Tuc and Kepler stars have identical planet populations. The revised number of expected detections is $4.0^{+1.7}_{-1.4}$. When we restrict the Kepler stars to the same range of masses as the stars that were searched in 47 Tuc, the number of expected detections is reduced to $2.2^{+1.6}_{-1.1}$. Thus, the null result of the HST search is less statistically significant than it originally seemed. We cannot reject even the extreme hypothesis that 47 Tuc and Kepler stars have the same planet populations, with more than 2-3$\sigma$ significance. More sensitive searches are needed to allow comparisons between the planet populations of globular clusters and field stars.

Submitted to arXiv on 17 Mar. 2017

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1703.06136v1

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In a recent study, Kento Masuda and Joshua N. Winn have revisited the null result of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) search for transiting planets in the globular cluster 47 Tucanae. The authors updated the original study by Gilliland and co-workers, who expected to find 17 planets assuming that stars in 47 Tuc had close-in giant planets with similar characteristics and occurrence rates as those of nearby stars surveyed up until 1999. The new study assumes that 47 Tuc and Kepler stars have identical planet populations, resulting in a revised number of expected detections of $4.0^{+1.7}_{-1.4}$. However, when restricting the Kepler stars to the same mass range as those searched in 47 Tuc, the number of expected detections is reduced to $2.2^{+1.6}_{-1.1}$. The results suggest that the null result of the HST search is less statistically significant than originally thought; even extreme hypotheses such as 47 Tuc and Kepler stars having identical planet populations cannot be rejected with more than 2-3$\sigma$ significance. This finding highlights the need for more sensitive searches to allow comparisons between planet populations in globular clusters and field stars. Overall, this study provides valuable insights into our understanding of planetary systems within globular clusters and their similarities or differences compared to those found around field stars. It also emphasizes how important it is to conduct further research using more advanced techniques so we can better compare planet populations between globular clusters and field stars.
Created on 07 Apr. 2023

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