Who Benefits from the "Sharing" Economy of Airbnb?

AI-generated keywords: Sharing Economy Airbnb Regulation Evidence-Based Policy Making Algorithmic Regulation

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Sharing economy platforms have transformed the way we travel, commute, and borrow
  • Such companies are often poorly regulated despite their popularity among consumers
  • Airbnb has faced criticism from regulators and policymakers for its lack of regulation
  • Municipalities engage in a false dichotomy: some allow the business without imposing any regulation while others ban it altogether due to a lack of evidence upon which to draft policies
  • Researchers propose gathering evidence from the web to determine where and when Airbnb listings are offered and match this information with census and hotel data to determine the socio-economic conditions of areas that benefit from the hospitality platform
  • Traditional regulations have not been able to respond to changes in Airbnb demand and offering over time
  • Areas with higher levels of deprivation tend to have more affordable listings on Airbnb compared to wealthier areas where prices are higher
  • Algorithmic regulation can be used as an effective tool for regulating sharing economy platforms like Airbnb by providing real-time responses based on data analysis
Also access our AI generated: Comprehensive summary, Lay summary, Blog-like article; or ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant.

Authors: Giovanni Quattrone, Davide Proserpio, Daniele Quercia, Licia Capra, Mirco Musolesi

In Proceedings of the 26th International ACM Conference on World Wide Web (WWW), 2016

Abstract: Sharing economy platforms have become extremely popular in the last few years, and they have changed the way in which we commute, travel, and borrow among many other activities. Despite their popularity among consumers, such companies are poorly regulated. For example, Airbnb, one of the most successful examples of sharing economy platform, is often criticized by regulators and policy makers. While, in theory, municipalities should regulate the emergence of Airbnb through evidence-based policy making, in practice, they engage in a false dichotomy: some municipalities allow the business without imposing any regulation, while others ban it altogether. That is because there is no evidence upon which to draft policies. Here we propose to gather evidence from the Web. After crawling Airbnb data for the entire city of London, we find out where and when Airbnb listings are offered and, by matching such listing information with census and hotel data, we determine the socio-economic conditions of the areas that actually benefit from the hospitality platform. The reality is more nuanced than one would expect, and it has changed over the years. Airbnb demand and offering have changed over time, and traditional regulations have not been able to respond to those changes. That is why, finally, we rely on our data analysis to envision regulations that are responsive to real-time demands, contributing to the emerging idea of "algorithmic regulation".

Submitted to arXiv on 06 Feb. 2016

Ask questions about this paper to our AI assistant

You can also chat with multiple papers at once here.

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the AI assistant only knows about the paper metadata rather than the full article.

AI assistant instructions?

Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1602.02238v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

The rise of sharing economy platforms has transformed the way we travel, commute, and borrow. However, despite their popularity among consumers, such companies are often poorly regulated. Airbnb, one of the most successful examples of a sharing economy platform, has faced criticism from regulators and policymakers for its lack of regulation. While municipalities should regulate the emergence of Airbnb through evidence-based policy making, in practice they often engage in a false dichotomy: some allow the business without imposing any regulation while others ban it altogether due to a lack of evidence upon which to draft policies. To address this issue, researchers Giovanni Quattrone, Davide Proserpio, Daniele Quercia, Licia Capra and Mirco Musolesi propose gathering evidence from the web to determine where and when Airbnb listings are offered and match this information with census and hotel data to determine the socio-economic conditions of areas that benefit from the hospitality platform. Their analysis reveals that traditional regulations have not been able to respond to changes in Airbnb demand and offering over time. The authors' study provides insights into who benefits from Airbnb's services in London by analyzing data on listings alongside census and hotel data. The findings reveal that areas with higher levels of deprivation tend to have more affordable listings on Airbnb compared to wealthier areas where prices are higher. The study also highlights how traditional regulations have failed to keep up with changes in demand for Airbnb services over time. Overall, this research demonstrates how algorithmic regulation can be used as an effective tool for regulating sharing economy platforms like Airbnb by providing real-time responses based on data analysis rather than relying solely on traditional regulatory approaches that may not be responsive enough or flexible enough to adapt quickly enough as markets change over time.
Created on 27 Apr. 2023

Assess the quality of the AI-generated content by voting

Score: 0

Why do we need votes?

Votes are used to determine whether we need to re-run our summarizing tools. If the count reaches -10, our tools can be restarted.

Similar papers summarized with our AI tools

Navigate through even more similar papers through a

tree representation

Look for similar papers (in beta version)

By clicking on the button above, our algorithm will scan all papers in our database to find the closest based on the contents of the full papers and not just on metadata. Please note that it only works for papers that we have generated summaries for and you can rerun it from time to time to get a more accurate result while our database grows.

Disclaimer: The AI-based summarization tool and virtual assistant provided on this website may not always provide accurate and complete summaries or responses. We encourage you to carefully review and evaluate the generated content to ensure its quality and relevance to your needs.