Protoplanetary disk lifetimes vs stellar mass and possible implications for giant planet populations

AI-generated keywords: Protoplanetary disk Stellar Mass Young Stellar Objects Gas Giant Planet Formation Migration

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  • The study investigates the relationship between protoplanetary disk evolution and stellar mass using a large sample of young stellar objects in nearby star-forming regions.
  • The authors update the protoplanetary disk fractions presented in their previous work for 22 nearby associations aged between 1 and 100 Myr.
  • A subsample of 1,428 spectroscopically confirmed members is used to examine the impact of stellar mass on protoplanetary disk evolution by dividing the sample into two stellar mass bins (2 M$_{\odot}$ boundary) and two age bins (3 Myr boundary).
  • Objects are classified into three groups based on infrared excesses over photospheric emission: protoplanetary disks, evolved disks, and diskless.
  • The authors find robust statistical evidence that protoplanetary disk evolution depends on stellar mass, with disks evolving faster or earlier around high-mass (>2 M$_{\odot}$) stars compared to low-mass stars.
  • They also observe a roughly constant level of evolved disks throughout the entire age and stellar mass spectra.
  • Such dependence could have important implications for gas giant planet formation and migration, which may contribute to explaining the apparent paucity of hot Jupiters around high-mass stars.
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Authors: Álvaro Ribas, Hervé Bouy, Bruno Merín

arXiv: 1502.00631v1 - DOI (astro-ph.SR)
Accepted for publication in A&A. 13 pages, 8 figures, 5 tables

Abstract: We study the dependence of protoplanetary disk evolution on stellar mass using a large sample of young stellar objects in nearby young star-forming regions. We update the protoplanetary disk fractions presented in our recent work (paper I of this series) derived for 22 nearby (< 500 pc) associations between 1 and 100 Myr. We use a subsample of 1 428 spectroscopically confirmed members to study the impact of stellar mass on protoplanetary disk evolution. We divide this sample into two stellar mass bins (2 M$_{\odot}$ boundary) and two age bins (3 Myr boundary), and use infrared excesses over the photospheric emission to classify objects in three groups: protoplanetary disks, evolved disks, and diskless. The homogeneous analysis and bias corrections allow for a statistically significant inter-comparison of the obtained results. We find robust statistical evidence of disk evolution dependence with stellar mass. Our results, combined with previous studies on disk evolution, confirm that protoplanetary disks evolve faster and/or earlier around high-mass (> 2 M$_{\odot}$) stars. We also find a roughly constant level of evolved disks throughout the whole age and stellar mass spectra. We conclude that protoplanetary disk evolution depends on stellar mass. Such a dependence could have important implications for gas giant planet formation and migration, and could contribute to explaining the apparent paucity of hot Jupiters around high-mass stars.

Submitted to arXiv on 02 Feb. 2015

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In their study, "Protoplanetary disk lifetimes vs stellar mass and possible implications for giant planet populations," Álvaro Ribas, Hervé Bouy, and Bruno Merín investigate the relationship between protoplanetary disk evolution and stellar mass using a large sample of young stellar objects in nearby star-forming regions. The authors update the protoplanetary disk fractions presented in their previous work (paper I of this series) for 22 nearby associations (< 500 pc) aged between 1 and 100 Myr. They use a subsample of 1,428 spectroscopically confirmed members to examine the impact of stellar mass on protoplanetary disk evolution by dividing the sample into two stellar mass bins (2 M$_{\odot}$ boundary) and two age bins (3 Myr boundary). The authors classify objects into three groups based on infrared excesses over photospheric emission: protoplanetary disks, evolved disks, and diskless. The homogeneous analysis and bias corrections allow for a statistically significant inter-comparison of results. The authors find robust statistical evidence that protoplanetary disk evolution depends on stellar mass. Their results confirm that protoplanetary disks evolve faster or earlier around high-mass (>2 M$_{\odot}$) stars compared to low-mass stars. They also observe a roughly constant level of evolved disks throughout the entire age and stellar mass spectra. The authors conclude that such dependence could have important implications for gas giant planet formation and migration, which may contribute to explaining the apparent paucity of hot Jupiters around high-mass stars. This study provides valuable insights into understanding how planetary systems form around different types of stars.
Created on 05 Apr. 2023

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