Astrometric exoplanet detection with Gaia

AI-generated keywords: Exoplanet Gaia Astrometry Detection TRILEGAL

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Michael Perryman, Joel Hartman, Gáspár Bakos, and Lennart Lindegren provide a revised assessment of the number of exoplanets that could be discovered by the Gaia astrometry mission.
  • The authors extend previous studies to include a broader range of spectral types, distances, and magnitudes.
  • Their assessment is based on a large representative sample of host stars from the TRILEGAL Galaxy population synthesis model, recent estimates of the exoplanet frequency distributions as a function of stellar type, and detailed simulations of Gaia observations using updated instrument performance and scanning laws.
  • Two approaches are used to estimate detectable planetary systems: one based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the astrometric signature per field crossing which allows for easy reproducibility and comparison with previous estimates; and a new metric based on orbit fitting to simulated satellite data that is more robust.
  • Based on plausible assumptions about planet occurrences they find that some 21000 (+/-6000) high-mass (1-15M_J) long-period planets should be discovered out to distances of approximately 500pc for the nominal 5-year mission. This includes at least 1000-1500 planets around M dwarfs out to 100pc. For a 10-year mission duration this number rises to approximately 70000 (+/-20000).
  • The authors also indicate some expected features of this exoplanet population. Among them are approximately 25-50 intermediate-period (P~2-3yr) transiting systems.
  • Overall this study provides valuable insights into the potential discoveries that could be made by Gaia astrometry in terms of exoplanet detection across various spectral types and distances.
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Authors: Michael Perryman, Joel Hartman, Gáspár Bakos, Lennart Lindegren

arXiv: 1411.1173v1 - DOI (astro-ph.EP)
41 pages, 12 figures; accepted for publication in ApJ

Abstract: We provide a revised assessment of the number of exoplanets that should be discovered by Gaia astrometry, extending previous studies to a broader range of spectral types, distances, and magnitudes. Our assessment is based on a large representative sample of host stars from the TRILEGAL Galaxy population synthesis model, recent estimates of the exoplanet frequency distributions as a function of stellar type, and detailed simulation of the Gaia observations using the updated instrument performance and scanning law. We use two approaches to estimate detectable planetary systems: one based on the S/N of the astrometric signature per field crossing, easily reproducible and allowing comparisons with previous estimates, and a new and more robust metric based on orbit fitting to the simulated satellite data. With some plausible assumptions on planet occurrences, we find that some 21,000 (+/-6000) high-mass (1-15M_J) long-period planets should be discovered out to distances of ~500pc for the nominal 5-yr mission (including at least 1000-1500 around M dwarfs out to 100pc), rising to some 70,000 (+/-20,000) for a 10-yr mission. We indicate some of the expected features of this exoplanet population, amongst them ~25-50 intermediate-period (P~2-3yr) transiting systems.

Submitted to arXiv on 05 Nov. 2014

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1411.1173v1

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In their paper titled "Astrometric exoplanet detection with Gaia," Michael Perryman, Joel Hartman, Gáspár Bakos, and Lennart Lindegren provide a revised assessment of the number of exoplanets that could be discovered by the Gaia astrometry mission. The authors extend previous studies to include a broader range of spectral types, distances, and magnitudes. Their assessment is based on a large representative sample of host stars from the TRILEGAL Galaxy population synthesis model, recent estimates of the exoplanet frequency distributions as a function of stellar type, and detailed simulations of Gaia observations using updated instrument performance and scanning laws. The authors use two approaches to estimate detectable planetary systems: one based on the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the astrometric signature per field crossing which allows for easy reproducibility and comparison with previous estimates; and a new metric based on orbit fitting to simulated satellite data that is more robust. Based on plausible assumptions about planet occurrences they find that some 21000 (+/-6000) high-mass (1-15M_J) long-period planets should be discovered out to distances of approximately 500pc for the nominal 5-year mission. This includes at least 1000-1500 planets around M dwarfs out to 100pc. For a 10-year mission duration this number rises to approximately 70000 (+/-20000). The authors also indicate some expected features of this exoplanet population. Among them are approximately 25-50 intermediate-period (P~2-3yr) transiting systems. Overall this study provides valuable insights into the potential discoveries that could be made by Gaia astrometry in terms of exoplanet detection across various spectral types and distances.
Created on 22 Mar. 2023

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