Collapse and fragmentation of molecular clouds under pressure

AI-generated keywords: AGN outflows ISM pressure star formation turbulent clouds shockwave

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Increased ambient interstellar medium (ISM) pressure can accelerate star formation
  • AGN outflows and jets create ISM pressure that is much larger than in quiescent systems
  • External pressure can confine and compress molecular gas, leading to accelerated fragmentation rate and increased mass conversion into stars
  • Clouds compressed by external pressure produce more compact clusters initially
  • External pressure dominates over internal cloud pressure in the star formation process
  • Cloud rotation or shear against the ISM do not significantly affect this result unless the shear velocity is higher than the sound speed in the confining ISM
  • AGN outflows can play a crucial role in shaping star-forming regions within galaxies.
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Authors: Kastytis Zubovas, Kostas Sabulis, Rokas Naujalis

arXiv: 1405.7516v1 - DOI (astro-ph.GA)
20 pages, 9 figures. Accepted for publication in MNRAS

Abstract: Recent analytical and numerical models show that AGN outflows and jets create ISM pressure in the host galaxy that is several orders of magnitude larger than in quiescent systems. This pressure increase can confine and compress molecular gas, thus accelerating star formation. In this paper, we model the effects of increased ambient ISM pressure on spherically symmetric turbulent molecular clouds. We find that large external pressure confines the cloud and drives a shockwave into it, which, together with instabilities behind the shock front, significantly accelerates the fragmentation rate. The compressed clouds therefore convert a larger fraction of their mass into stars over the cloud lifetime, and produce clusters that are initially more compact. Neither cloud rotation nor shear against the ISM affect this result significantly, unless the shear velocity is higher than the sound speed in the confining ISM. We conclude that external pressure is an important element in the star formation process, provided that it dominates over the internal pressure of the cloud.

Submitted to arXiv on 29 May. 2014

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1405.7516v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

This paper explores the effects of increased ambient interstellar medium (ISM) pressure on spherically symmetric turbulent molecular clouds and its impact on star formation. Recent analytical and numerical models have demonstrated that AGN outflows and jets create ISM pressure in the host galaxy that is several orders of magnitude larger than in quiescent systems. This external pressure can confine and compress molecular gas, thus accelerating star formation. The study finds that large external pressure confines the cloud and drives a shockwave into it, which together with instabilities behind the shock front significantly accelerates the fragmentation rate. Consequently, compressed clouds convert a larger fraction of their mass into stars over their lifetime, producing clusters that are initially more compact. The results show that external pressure is an important element in the star formation process provided it dominates over the internal pressure of the cloud. Neither cloud rotation nor shear against the ISM affect this result significantly unless the shear velocity is higher than the sound speed in the confining ISM. This research highlights how external factors such as AGN outflows can play a crucial role in shaping star-forming regions within galaxies.
Created on 29 Mar. 2023

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