On-Orbit Degradation of Solar Instruments

AI-generated keywords: Space Solar Missions Degradation Sun-Observing Instruments Space Environment Recommendations

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • A workshop was held in Brussels on May 3, 2012 at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence
  • The focus of the workshop was on degradation observed in several space solar missions
  • Experts from various institutions and expertise contributed to the workshop
  • Lessons learned from these contributions were summarized in the article
  • Recommendations for future and ongoing space missions were offered
  • A list of contributors who participated in the workshop is included
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Authors: A. BenMoussa, S. Gissot, U. Schühle, G. Del Zanna, F. Auchère, S. Mekaoui, A. R. Jones, D. Walton, C. J. Eyles, G. Thuillier, D. Seaton, I. E. Dammasch, G. Cessateur, M. Meftah, V. Andretta, D. Berghmans, D. Bewsher, D. Bolsée, L. Bradley, D. S. Brown, P. C. Chamberlin, S. Dewitte, L. V. Didkovsky, M. Dominique, F. G. Eparvier, T. Foujols, D. Gillotay, B. Giordanengo, J. -P. Halain, R. A. Hock, A. Irbah, C. Jeppesen, D. L. Judge, M. Kretzschmar, D. R. McMullin, B. Nicula, W. Schmutz, G. Ucker, S. Wieman, D. Woodraska, T. N. Woods

arXiv: 1304.5488v1 - DOI (astro-ph.IM)

Abstract: We present the lessons learned about the degradation observed in several space solar missions, based on contributions at the Workshop about On-Orbit Degradation of Solar and Space Weather Instruments that took place at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence (Royal Observatory of Belgium) in Brussels on 3 May 2012. The aim of this workshop was to open discussions related to the degradation observed in Sun-observing instruments exposed to the effects of the space environment. This article summarizes the various lessons learned and offers recommendations to reduce or correct expected degradation with the goal of increasing the useful lifespan of future and ongoing space missions.

Submitted to arXiv on 19 Apr. 2013

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1304.5488v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

This article presents the findings and recommendations from a workshop held at the Solar Terrestrial Centre of Excellence in Brussels on May 3, 2012. The workshop focused on the degradation observed in several space solar missions and aimed to discuss ways to reduce or correct expected degradation to increase their useful lifespan. Contributions were made by experts in the field representing a wide range of institutions and expertise. The article summarizes various lessons learned from these contributions and offers recommendations for future and ongoing space missions. It also includes a list of contributors who participated in the workshop providing valuable insights into how we can improve our understanding of on-orbit degradation and ensure that future space missions are better equipped to withstand these challenges.
Created on 24 Apr. 2023

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