An algorithm for calculating D-optimal designs for polynomial regression with prior information and its appilications

AI-generated keywords: Optimal designs Canonical moments Integrable systems Polynomial regression models Prior information

AI-generated Key Points

The license of the paper does not allow us to build upon its content and the key points are generated using the paper metadata rather than the full article.

  • Optimal designs are important for efficient experiments in statistics
  • Canonical moments can be used to calculate D-optimal designs for certain models
  • Hiroto Sekido proposes a new method that uses discrete integrable systems and their relationship with canonical moments to calculate D-optimal designs for polynomial regression models with prior information
  • Integrable systems are dynamical systems whose solutions can be explicitly written down
  • Sekido presents an algorithm that leverages the properties of integrable systems and canonical moments to calculate D-optimal designs for polynomial regression models
  • The algorithm is effective and has potential applications in various fields where efficient statistical experiments are necessary.
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Authors: Hiroto Sekido

arXiv: 1211.0727v1 - DOI (stat.ME)

Abstract: Optimal designs are required to make efficient statistical experiments. D-optimal designs for some models are calculated by using canonical moments. On the other hand, integrable systems are dynamical systems whose solutions can be written down concretely. In this paper, polynomial regression models with prior information are discussed. In order to calculate D-optimal designs for these models, a useful relationship between canonical moments and discrete integrable systems is used. By using canonical moments and discrete integrable systems, an algorithm for calculating D-optimal designs for these models is proposed. Then some examples of applications of the algorithm are introduced.

Submitted to arXiv on 04 Nov. 2012

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Results of the summarizing process for the arXiv paper: 1211.0727v1

This paper's license doesn't allow us to build upon its content and the summarizing process is here made with the paper's metadata rather than the article.

In the field of statistics, optimal designs are crucial for conducting efficient experiments. One approach to calculating D-optimal designs for certain models is through the use of canonical moments. However, in this paper by Hiroto Sekido, a new method is proposed that utilizes discrete integrable systems and their relationship with canonical moments to calculate D-optimal designs for polynomial regression models with prior information. Integrable systems are dynamical systems whose solutions can be explicitly written down. By leveraging this property along with canonical moments, Sekido presents an algorithm for calculating D-optimal designs for polynomial regression models. The algorithm is then applied to several examples to demonstrate its effectiveness and potential applications in various fields where efficient statistical experiments are necessary. This paper offers a novel approach to calculating optimal experimental designs that takes advantage of the properties of integrable systems and their relationship with canonical moments.
Created on 27 Apr. 2023

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